EPA makes enhancements to app used to track U.S. waterway conditions

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WASHINGTON, DC, April 21, 2014 -- An enhanced version of Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) "How's My Waterway" app and website has recently been released. The software serves as a platform to help people find information on the condition of thousands of lakes, rivers and streams across the United States from their tablet, smartphone or desktop computer.

Using GPS technology or a user-entered zip code or city name, EPA's waterway-tracking technology (available here) provides valuable information about the quality of local waterbodies. Likewise, the new version of the site includes data on local drinking water sources, watersheds and efforts to protect waterways, as well as a map-oriented version of "How's My Waterway" designed for museum kiosks, displays and touch screens (available here).

Accordingly, the enhanced version includes new data and improvements based on user feedback to the original site, including localized information on:

  • The waterways that supply drinking water to communities
  • The health of watersheds and organizations working to protect watersheds
  • Permits that limit pollutant discharge into waterways
  • Efforts to restore waterways to protect and improve fish habitats by the National Fish Habitat Partnerships

"Communities and neighborhoods across the U.S. want to know that their local lakes, rivers and streams are healthy and safe to enjoy with their families, and providing that information is a priority for EPA," said acting assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Water Nancy Stoner. "The enhanced version of 'How’s My Waterway' provides easy, user-friendly access to the health of the places we swim, fish and boat, where we get our drinking water, and what is being done to curb water pollution. People can get this information whether researching at a desktop or standing streamside looking at a smartphone."

See also: "EPA launches new app to track conditions of U.S. waterways"

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