Ontario WWTPs adopt new stators to increase pump life

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SPRINGFIELD, OHIO, April 16, 2014 – The city of Hamilton, Ontario has implemented new stators for its wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) as a means to increase pump life in the facilities, ultimately lowering maintenance costs and reducing downtime for its treatment operations over time.

The city of Hamilton’s WWTPs have continuously battled with the abrasive quality of the processed water, and as a result, the abrasive sludge has caused shortened life for their nitrile stators. Further, it became an issue due to the cost of continuous maintenance and replacement stators.

Accordingly, Moyno partnered with Hamilton to test its new urethane stators in the city’s abrasive municipal sludge application; their performance far exceeded Hamilton’s expectations. As such, the city has ordered five additional new urethane replacement stators for its pumps after the first one outlasted the nitrile stator by more than 10 times and continued to operate without failure.

 

Hamilton’s WWTPs collect both sanitary and combined sewage (wastewater). The collection system services not only the city but also the surrounding areas, including the towns of Dundas, Ancaster, Water Down, Glanbrook Township, and the former city of Stoney Creek.

The city of Hamilton’s Woodward Avenue WWTP began operations in 1964 and today averages 409 million liters per day with a peak capacity of over 600 million liters per day. Likewise, the successful operation of its wastewater treatment is vital to the surrounding environment, especially the Hamilton Harbor.

See also: “Wastewater infrastructure improvements help clean up Canada's Hamilton Harbor

About NOV Mono Group

NOV Mono is a division of National Oilwell Varco. It comprises a group of specialist companies offering progressing cavity pumps, artificial lift systems, industrial mixers, heat exchangers, grinders, screens and aftermarket replacement parts and services, across a broad spectrum of industrial sectors including water and wastewater, oil and gas, chemical, pulp and paper, food and beverage and agriculture. For more information, visit www.moyno.com.

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