DC students selected for finals in watershed improvement contest

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WASHINGTON, DC, April 17, 2014 -- Several students in Washington, D.C., recently participated in and submitted proposals for the annual CARING FOR OUR WATERSHEDS program -- a contest engaging students to develop new ideas in helping preserve and improve their local watersheds. Of the 13 submitted proposals, five have been selected for a chance to be put into action.

Formed by Agrium Inc. (TSX:AGU) (NYSE:AGU) and the Battle River Watershed Alliance, the CARING FOR OUR WATERSHEDS program is an environmental educational competition that partners with communities to encourage creativity and reward students for the solutions they identify toward local watershed issues. Each year, Agrium invites students to submit proposals that answer the question, "What can you do to improve your watershed?"

Each of the five proposals are from a different DC Public School or DC Public Charter School. The projects include:

  • Trees Please! (Jefferson Academy) -- Students will host a tree planting on their campus on Earth Day. The trees will slow runoff from the school parking lot, and the event will be an opportunity to educate the community on the importance of trees in the Anacostia River Watershed.
  • Litter Commercial (LaSalle Backus Education Campus) -- In an effort to raise awareness about the impact of litter on the watershed and to encourage people to stop littering, the class will work with students at the University of Maryland to create an anti-littering commercial.
  • Play Away the Smoke (Roots Public Charter School) -- Students will work with a developer to create an app that will help to reduce the effects of smoking on the environment. The app will highlight the environmental, economic and health impacts of smoking.
  • Watershed Awareness (SEED School of DC) -- This awareness campaign includes a school-wide Watershed Day and pep rally during Earth Week, the creation of signs offering watershed protection tips to put up around the neighborhood, and a rap commercial that will teach people quick and easy tips to help the watershed.
  • Littering Camera (Washington Latin Public Charter School) -- Students will install littering cameras to help enforce littering laws.

"The creativity this contest affords students is beneficial for our environment and the communities we serve," said Kurt Moser, Senior Program Manager at Earth Force. "Anytime we can engage and involve our youth in environmental conversation benefits us all. They are actively seeking ways to make our communities sustainable for future generations, and we are here to help them."

Five projects will be presented at the 2014 Anacostia Environmental Youth Summit on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Anacostia Park in Washington, DC. Students will compete for cash prizes between $300 and $1,000, with an additional $10,000 to be provided by sponsor Agrium for project implementation. Approximately 400 students from DC Public Schools and DC Public Charter Schools are expected to attend. For more information, visit http://www.CaringForOurWatersheds.com

See also: "Student watershed improvement contest underway in Alberta"

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