Partnership to deliver advanced solutions for groundwater resources

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April 18, 2014 -- A new partnership has recently been formed to provide solutions focused on better acquisition, modeling and characterization of groundwater resources. Likewise, the collaboration combines advanced methodology and technology for exploratory purposes in the field of fresh and saline water resources management.

The partnership -- established between Exploration Resources International Geophysics, LLC (XRI) and SkyTEM Surveys (SkyTEM) -- combines XRI's geophysical and hydrogeological offerings with SkyTEM's airborne aquifer mapping technology to help communities, industries and resource sectors manage these limited and vulnerable resources sustainably, today and into the future.

Groundwater is one of the nation's most important natural resources, and it is increasingly essential to provide effective programs for management of aquifer systems worldwide. Proper management requires thorough knowledge of the aquifer system. This includes dependable information on geographic extents, volume, water quality recharge, and outflow levels.

SkyTEM’s airborne electromagnetic (AEM) systems are non-invasive and provide a quick economic method for mapping groundwater, particularly for large areas or areas where land access is limited or difficult. XRI interprets the airborne data to deliver 2D and 3D images used to build hydrogeological frameworks for groundwater quality investigations, groundwater flow modeling and groundwater management planning.

See also:

"Groundwater mapping in India uses helicopter geophysical system"

"Life Underground: Mapping Additional Groundwater Supplies in Kenya"

About XRI

XRI is a fully integrated geosciences company with proven solutions in geophysics, geology, hydrology, water resource engineering and management, geospatial applications and geotechnical engineering.  XRI’s professional staff are expert in their fields and have decades of experience that spans seven continents.  The company works closely and collaboratively with private and public industry and government customers to deliver comprehensive solutions through a variety of modeling, analytical and applied techniques. For more information, visit www.xrigeo.com.

About SkyTEM

SkyTEM is a time-domain airborne geophysical system engineered to deliver accurate high-resolution maps of changes in geology from the very near surface to depths of hundreds of meters.  The SkyTEM method, developed in Denmark specifically to map aquifers, has been applied for groundwater studies worldwide – from mapping aquifers in the Galapagos Islands and salt water encroachment in Australia to identifying paleochannels in the USA’s Ogallala Aquifer and ice and water distribution beneath Antarctica.  SkyTEM technology is also applied to a variety of environmental and engineering studies. For more information, visit www.skytem.com.

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