New animated video illustrates human impact on water cycle

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ALEXANDRIA, VA, May 20, 2014 -- A new animated video produced by the WateReuse Research Foundation (WRRF) presents an overview of the many human interventions in the water cycle and looks at the benefits of some key water provision options including direct potable reuse (DPR).

Titled "The Ways of Water", the new film avoids the technical jargon common in the water industry and provides an easy-to-understand presentation of the urban water cycle and water purification. Further, it was created as part of the WateReuse DPR Initiative, a research program launched in 2012 to address regulatory, utility and community concerns regarding DPR in the state of California.

Nearly 50 public water agencies, consulting engineering firms and suppliers have pledged nearly $6 million to advance DPR as a water supply option. DPR means the reused water is placed directly into pipelines that travel to a water treatment plant or distribution system, instead of first sending it to a groundwater basin or surface water reservoir. 

"This animation is an excellent public education resource for water utilities, water providers and water purification agencies," said Foundation Chairman Richard Nagel of the West Basin Municipal Water District in Carson, Calif.

Foundation Executive Director Melissa L. Meeker added, "We are extremely proud of this educational video. It provides a clear and concise explanation of how communities provide a safe and sustainable water supply using the right water properly treated for the right use."

"The Ways of Water" animation is one component of an ongoing research project lead by Carollo Engineers titled "Guidelines for Engineered Storage for Direct Potable Reuse (WRRF-12-06)." The video was directed by James Hutson of Bridge8 and produced by New Water Resources as a part of the research project.

View the video here:

See also: "CA engineering firm supports Direct Potable Reuse initiative"


About the WateReuse Research Foundation

The WateReuse Research Foundation was formed as a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization in 1993 to conduct applied research on water reuse and desalination and to build a sound scientific body of knowledge to support the Association’s complimentary mission. To date, the Research Foundation has sponsored more than $51 million of leading edge/cutting edge research on water reuse and desalination, funding more than 170 projects. This applied research has directly impacted water scarcity through the knowledge, information, and tools it has produced for the water community. For more information, visit www.watereuse.org/foundation.

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