NSF expert to discuss new water treatment chemical requirements at ACE14

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May 20, 2014 -- On June 8-12, the American Water Works Association (AWWA) will host its Annual Conference & Exposition (ACE14) at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center in Boston, Mass. There, Dave Purkiss, general manager of NSF International's Municipal Water Products Division, will highlight new requirements for imported drinking water treatment chemicals on Tuesday, June 10, at 10:30 a.m. in room 257B.

Purkiss' presentation titled "Raising the Bar for Treatment Chemicals" will discuss the need for tamper evident packaging and controls for imported chemicals and how new requirements in NSF/ANSI Standard 60: Drinking Water Treatment Chemicals – Health Effects address the issue.

NSF/ANSI 60 sets health effects criteria for many water treatment chemicals including: corrosion and scale inhibitors; coagulants and flocculants; disinfection and oxidation chemicals; pH adjustment, softening, precipitation and sequestering chemicals; and other specialty chemicals used in drinking water treatment. The new requirements harmonize the frequency of retesting and address other certification practices for compliance monitoring.

See also: "Changes to Standard 60 and how they relate to chlorine vs. sodium hypochlorite as a drinking water disinfectant"

About NSF International

NSF International is an independent global organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the food, water, health sciences and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment (nsf.org). Founded in 1944, NSF is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. NSF International is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment. For more information, visit www.nsf.com.

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