MO sewer district hits milestone with completion of 3,200-foot tunnel boring

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A 150-ton tunnel boring machine breaks through on the Lemay Redundant Force Main.
ST. LOUIS, MO, May 28, 2014 -- On Monday, May 19, the St. Louis Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) hit a major milestone when a 150-ton tunnel boring machine (TBM) broke through the final few feet on the 11-1/4-foot-diameter, 3,200-linear-foot Lemay Redundant Force Main beneath the River Des Peres in south St. Louis, Mo.

The tunnel will permit MSD's Lemay Wastewater Treatment Plant to accept a higher volume of wastewater and allow MSD to inspect the original force main for the first time since its construction in the 1960s.

SAK Construction, LLC (SAK), based in O'Fallon, Mo., is the contractor on the project and began boring the tunnel on Feb. 28, 2014. The excavation yielded 12,000 cubic yards, or 1,300 tons of bedrock and limestone. SAK had a minimum of 23 workers on site at any given time with workers operating the cutting head of the TBM in two shifts, totaling 16 hours a day.

The Lemay project is one of many being undertaken by MSD as part of Project Clear, its multi-decade, multi-billion-dollar initiative to improve water quality and alleviate many wastewater concerns in the St. Louis region.

See also:

"One of nation's largest UV wastewater disinfection systems completed in MO"

"Completion of WWTP expansion design brings St. Louis closer to wet-weather flow goals"


About SAK


Founded in 2006, SAK Construction makes its national headquarters in O'Fallon, Mo., and has active projects across the U.S. It operates regional headquarters in Sacramento, Calif., Tampa, Fla. and Baltimore, Md. SAK solves the challenge of maintaining and restoring aging water, sanitary, and oil and gas pipeline infrastructure for the municipal, energy and industrial markets. With industry-leading experience and a commitment to service excellence, SAK is a trusted partner helping customers worldwide meet the task of renewing, protecting and expanding their pipeline infrastructure. For more information, visit www.sakcon.com.

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