Drinking Water Week 2014: Safe Drinking Water Act celebrates 40th anniversary

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DENVER, CO, May 8, 2014 -- As Drinking Water Week 2014 continues, the American Water Works Association (AWWA) and water professionals across the country are celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA).

The SDWA is celebrating 40 years of working diligently to safeguard the quality of drinking water in the United States. The Act is a federal law that went into effect in 1974 that works through effectively setting health-based standards and regulations and overseeing drinking water suppliers. Amendments to it in 1986 and 1996 increased the effectiveness and protection of drinking water and drinking water sources.

Currently in the U.S., community water systems are required to monitor their drinking water multiple times per day to test for more than 90 contaminants and report any violations that may have occurred.

"It's important to applaud the accomplishments of the Safe Drinking Water Act, which ensures that when the tap is turned on, safe and reliable water flows out," said AWWA Chief Executive Officer David LaFrance. "Thanks to the Safe Drinking Water Act, many enjoy pure and superb drinking water."

More information about the Safe Drinking Water Act is available on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) website.

See also:

"Drinking Water Week 2013: AWWA, water community recognize importance of drinking water"

"AWWA chief comments on 30th anniversary of SDWA"


About Drinking Water Week

For more than 35 years, AWWA and its members have celebrated Drinking Water Week – a unique opportunity for both water professionals and the communities they serve to join together to recognize the vital role water plays in our daily lives. Additional information about Drinking Water Week, including free materials for download and celebration ideas, is available on the Drinking Water Week website.

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