ADEQ's first solar-powered groundwater cleanup project completed

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PHOENIX, AR, June 30, 2014 -- On Tuesday, June 24, officials from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) announced that the agency has completed its first groundwater remediation project using solar energy in an instrumental role and saved nearly $13,000 in energy-related costs as a result.

Two solar-powered blowers were used as a power source in a process in which gas was removed from wells at the Rainbow Valley Citrus Maintenance Yard in Goodyear. Soil sampling collected during removal of two underground storage tanks earlier indicated that petroleum hydrocarbons leaked from the tanks. The contamination eventually reached the groundwater.

The State Lead Program of ADEQ's Waste Programs Division began cleaning up the site in 2012 and completed it on schedule last month. Two of the 10 onsite wells had gasoline in them. Initially, the contaminants were removed from the two wells by using a vacuum truck before the solar-powered air sparging process began.

The two solar-powered blowers were purchased for only $249, and installation and maintenance costs were minimal. The solar power saved an estimated 20,000 kilowatt hours in traditional electricity from the grid.

See also: "Solar Solutions: Utilities Harness Power of Sunlight to Reduce Costs, Save Energy"


About ADEQ

The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's mission is to protect and enhance public health, welfare and the environment in Arizona. Established by the Arizona Legislature in 1986 in response to growing concerns about groundwater quality, ADEQ today administers a variety of programs to improve the health and welfare of our citizens and ensure the quality of Arizona's air, land and water resources meets healthful, regulatory standards. For more information, visit www.azdeq.gov.

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