Floating desalination vessel nearing first commercial roll out

Sponsored by

Water company Hyflux used the Singapore International Water Week to showcase a model of its floating desalination production vessel, known as a FDPV.

With a capacity of 30,000 m3/day and at a length of 112.5m, the vessel has been designed for “humanitarian organisations or communities which require a clean supply of water urgently”.

Hyflux’s Kristal ultrafiltration (UF) membranes would be used for the on-board pre-treatment to help remove microorganisms and bacteria.

Electrical power would be provided from multiple generators installed on the vessel, with an energy recovery system also planned to be included.

There are then two reverse osmosis (RO) passes for the treatment of permeate from the UF. Once treated, water is stored in the product water tank before use.

With increasing discharge limits for wastewater and tighter planning obstacles, there is a growing trend for the development of off-shore treatment.

In April Bloomberg reported that Israeli company IDE Technologies was also in talks with Japanese shipbuilders and the government to design off-shore desalination plants.

The April-May edition of Water & Wastewater International (WWi) reported how the Norwegian company EnviroNor is developing a floating wastewater treatment vessel using old oil tankers (read WWi article).

Industry analysts Frost & Sullivan predicted the mobile water treatment market to generate revenues of $895 million by 2016 (read WWi article).

Speaking to WWi, Roland Ang, managing director, business development, said: “The Hyflux floating desalination vessel is a one-stop desalination mobile unit. It’s 30,000 m3/day at top capacity. It’s a whole process on board that includes RO/UF, including water storage.”

Ang suggested the first full scale FDPV could be rolled out in as little as six months, with the first deployment likely in the Middle East.

In the company’s corporate brochure on the FDPV, Hyflux suggested the floating vessel would be well placed to provide water in emergency situations.

It said: “Over the years, rapid climate change and the increase in occurrences of natural disasters globally have posed challenges for humanitarian organisations to provide a secure and clean supply of water to victims quickly.”

###

Read more

VIDEO: Top 5 Announcements from SIWW 2014                                                                                                                                 A video recap of the top five stories to come out of Singapore..

Algeria’s Magtaa supersized desalination plant: What’s the latest?                                                                                         An update on Hyflux’s 500,000 m3/day reverse osmosis project in North Africa…

Offshore Water Treatment: The Future?                                                                                                                                 Norwegian company EnviroNor is currently developing an innovative system that uses old oil or gas tankers as mobile wastewater treatment units. So, how exactly does the system work?

‘Macro factors’ to blame for China’s slowing desalination industry                                                                               Singapore water firm Hyflux has reported a marginal rise in profit in the second quarter of 2013 yet has said the Chinese market is experiencing a slow-down in industrial output…

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

Wastewater treatment to benefit 100 towns in China after ADB funding

The Asian Development Bank has signed a $300 million facility agreement with Sound Global to improve rural wastewater management using innovative technologies across the People’s Republic of China...

Desalination to account for 35% of membrane market

Global desalination will account for 35% of the $11 billion membrane market next year, driven by reuse and the necessity for pre-filter systems, according to a market update...

VIDEO: Desalination news round-up

Check out the latest global desalination news from the last two weeks...

City of Lima, Ohio, enters CWA settlement to reduce critical sewage overflows

To resolve claims that untreated sewer discharges were released into the Ottawa River during wet weather, the city of Lima, Ohio, has entered into a Clean Water Act settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Justice and State of Ohio.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA