CA water district board boosts small business outreach goal to 25 percent

Sponsored by


LOS ANGELES, CA, July 8, 2014 -- The Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of Southern California's board of directors has increased the goal for small business participation to 25 percent, which will provide more opportunities for small, local and regional businesses to engage in the district's wide array of projects and programs.

The revised goal is an increase from 18 percent and signifies the biggest modification to MWD's Business Outreach Program since launching in 2001. Between then and now, about 31 percent of the District's contracting dollars have been awarded to regional small businesses, representing a reinvestment of $1.2 billion into these businesses to date.

"Given the standard of success we've achieved in meeting and surpassing our previous goal, a formal increase in the overall organizational target for small business participation just makes sense," said Metropolitan board Chairman Randy Record. "The new goal raises the bar and better reflects our successes and capabilities.”"

Metropolitan General Manager Jeffrey Kightlinger added that the revised target reflects MWD's successful program and is comparable to other utility and government programs, including the Port of Los Angeles and the California Department of General Services, which also maintain a 25-percent goal.

"The link between regional water reliability and economic vitality defines our purpose for supporting increased business opportunities, competition and job creation," Kightlinger said. "A more diverse pool of vendors competing for business helps support the Southland's economy and provides added benefits to Metropolitan and its member public agencies."

See also:

"CA outreach, advertising campaign to encourage water conservation amid drought"

"Metropolitan, Los Angeles Unified School District sign agreement that improves small business contracting opportunities"


About MWD

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs. For more information, visit www.mwdh2o.com.

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

City of Lima, Ohio, enters CWA settlement to reduce critical sewage overflows

To resolve claims that untreated sewer discharges were released into the Ottawa River during wet weather, the city of Lima, Ohio, has entered into a Clean Water Act settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Justice and State of Ohio.

AWWA to Congress: Nutrient pollution reduction key to preventing cyanotoxins

In a testimony recently held before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, American Water Works Association President John Donahue stressed that the solution to keeping drinking water safe from cyanotoxins begins with reducing nutrient pollution.

Reclamation invests $9.2M in water, power research in West amid drought

Following a year of record drought, water managers throughout the West are searching for information and ideas to ensure a reliable and sustainable water supply. To meet this growing need, the Bureau of Reclamation has officially awarded $9.2 million for 131 research projects.

City of Philadelphia names first 'Stormwater Pioneer'

The Philadelphia Water Department has named Stanley's True Value Hardware as the city's first Stormwater Pioneer. The store's third-generation owners were recognized as role models for small business owners and private developers looking to reduce stormwater runoff.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA