Company to pay $2.5M penalty for CWA violations at LA wastewater plant

Sponsored by


DALLAS, TX, July 15, 2014 -- On Thursday, July 10, the Department of Justice, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the state of Louisiana announced that Houston-based CCS Inc. and several of its operating subsidiaries will pay a $2.5-million civil penalty relating to operations at its industrial wastewater treatment plant located in Shreveport, La.

The settlement will resolve violations of the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Clean Air Act and the hazardous waste law known as the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

In 2006, CCS acquired the plant through a purchase of two closely-held companies, and following the sale, inspections by EPA and the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality led to the discovery of these violations and others. 

These infractions include unpermitted storage and improper handling of hazardous wastes and sludge, unpermitted stormwater discharges and noncompliance with Clean Air Act requirements for benzene-containing wastes.

After discovering these violations, CCS ceased wastewater treatment operations at the facility. Under EPA supervision, CCS removed the hazardous wastes illegally stored there. The $2.5-million civil penalty will be split evenly between the United States and state of Louisiana.

The stipulation of settlement, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana, is subject to a 45-day public comment period and approval by the federal court.

See also:

"WA firms settle CWA violations with EPA as part of Puget Sound initiative"

"Company to upgrade 18 wastewater plants in MS to prevent illegal sewage discharges"

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

WaterWorld launches third WaterShots online photo contest

WaterWorld has officially launched its third WaterShots online photo contest, intended to capture the essence of aging water and wastewater infrastructure across the nation.

CT water treatment plants to make significant upgrades under EPA settlements

The cities of Groton and Norwich, Conn., will make significant upgrades to their drinking water treatment plants by eliminating chlorine gas at these facilities. These actions settle claims by the EPA that the cities violated federal clean air laws meant to prevent chemical accidents.

Expert Q & A: Meeting and Solving Industrial Water Conservation and Regulatory Challenges

U.S. Water Services is a leading national provider of integrated solutions for water treatment. Brand Manager Karen Danielson shares her insights on what's driving industrial water treatment technology innovation and how her company is rising to the challenge.

International collaboration leading to cost-effective agriculture water reuse policies

Researchers at the University of California in Riverside and Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel have partnered to launch a two-year study of the use of treated wastewater in agriculture, which will lead to viable and cost-effective regional water reuse policies.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA