Cortec opens state-of-the-art biotechnology campus in Florida

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July 11, 2014 -- Cortec® Corporation has announced the addition of its Cortec Biotechnology Campus, a state-of-the-art research facility featuring cutting-edge equipment for the manufacturing of the company's Migratory Corrosion Inhibitor (MCI®), Vapor phase Corrosion Inhibitor (Nano-VpCI®) coatings and Bionetix's bioremediation and cleaning products.

The new Campus, located in Sarasota, Fla., comprises 36,000 square feet (3,600 square meters) of office, manufacturing, warehouse, and two laboratory areas under one roof. Part of the warehouse will be designated for warehousing and shipping of Cortec products that are deemed "freezable" and cannot be shipped out of its Minnesota or Wisconsin plants during the winter months.

Cortec announces addition of Cortec Biotechnology Campus in Florida


Accordingly, this complex will also house two modern laboratories for biotechnology and marine corrosion research, as well as sales and customer support offices for the Southeastern U.S., Caribbean and Central and South Americas.

With this latest expansion, Cortec now has 400,000 square feet (40,000 square meters) of total prime space between its six plants and the Corporate Technical Center in St. Paul, Minn., and one plant each in Montreal, Canada, and Beli Manastir, Croatia. All these facilities combine the power of science, technology and chemistry.

About Cortec

Cortec Corporation is a global provider of innovative, environmentally-responsible VpCI and MCI corrosion-control technologies for Packaging, Metalworking, Construction, Electronics, Water Treatment, Oil & Gas, and other industries. Headquartered in St. Paul, Minn., Cortec manufactures over 400 products distributed worldwide. ISO 9001, ISO 14001:2004, & ISO 17025 Certified. For more information, visit www.cortecvci.com.

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