Six states, DC recognized for progress in Chesapeake Bay cleanup

Sponsored by


PHILADELPHIA, PA, July 2, 2014 -- The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its evaluations of the next round of actions that six states and the District of Columbia have committed to undertake in order to reduce nutrient and sediment pollution to their local waters and the Chesapeake Bay. The reviews offer a path forward for helping the seven jurisdictions refocus their efforts toward better restoring the Bay.

EPA's review of 2014-2015 milestone commitments by Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and District of Columbia is coupled with the Agency's assessment of the most recent milestones accomplished by each of the seven jurisdictions in 2012 and 2013. In addition, the agency assessed the actions taken by federal agencies to assist the jurisdictions in meeting these commitments.

Two-year milestones are short-term objectives under the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (Bay TMDL) accountability framework used to assess progress toward restoration goals while allowing jurisdictions to flexibly adapt their Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs) to meet those goals.

The jurisdictions' WIPs are key to restoring clean water to the thousands of streams and rivers that make up the Chesapeake Bay watershed and improving the quality of life for the nearly 18 million people who live in the watershed. When fully implemented, the seven WIPs will ensure that all practices necessary to meet water quality standards in the Chesapeake Bay will be in place by 2025. By 2017, jurisdictions should have practices in place that would achieve 60 percent of necessary nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment reductions compared to 2009.

The Bay jurisdictions' and federal agencies' 2014-2015 milestone commitments were developed by the states and the District with support from EPA, considering which practices and programs best fit each particular jurisdiction.

The 2014-2015 milestone commitments to reduce phosphorus and sediment remain on track. While nitrogen is projected to be collectively reduced at the end of 2015 by nearly 25 million pounds compared to 2009, this reduction is nearly 6 million pounds less than is needed to remain on track to meet the 2017 target. The jurisdictions will need to substantially increase nitrogen reductions in order to get back on track.

As for the most recent milestone accomplishments, data provided by the Bay jurisdictions show that the Chesapeake Bay Program partnership as a whole achieved the 2013 milestone targets for nitrogen and phosphorus. The partners fell short of their reduction commitments for sediment, but collectively they remain on track to meet the 2017 target.

See also:

"Agreement signed to restore, protect Chesapeake Bay Watershed"

"Water pollution in Chesapeake Bay Watershed continues to be reduced"

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

Water sector groups announce Water Week 2015 taking place in April

Next month, a diverse group of major U.S. water sector organizations will come together and join forces in Washington, D.C., to support Water Week 2015.

Xylem appoints new senior vice president, president of Emerging Markets

Xylem announced that it has appointed Steven Leung as senior vice president and president of Emerging Markets for the company -- a newly created position -- effective Wednesday, April 1, 2015.

Badger Meter officially named platinum sponsor of ACE15

For the third consecutive year, Badger Meter has been named the Platinum Sponsor of American Water Works Association's 134th Annual Conference and Exposition, taking place June 7-10 at the Anaheim Convention Center in the city of Anaheim, Calif.

Central Basin, Park Water extend partnership for recycled water project

Park Water Company recently announced that it has been awarded a two-year extension for its current contract to operate and maintain Central Basin Municipal Water District's E. Thornton Ibbetson Century Water Recycling Project.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA