Great Lakes shoreline cities to gain $4.5M to fund green infrastructure projects

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CHICAGO, IL, July 25, 2014 -- On Monday, July 21, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a solicitation for a second round of Great Lakes Shoreline Cities Grants. The Agency will award grants totaling up to $4.5 million to eligible shoreline cities to fund green infrastructure projects that will improve water quality throughout the Great Lakes.

This year, shoreline cities with a population greater than 25,000 and less than 50,000 will be eligible to apply for green infrastructure grants of up to $250,000. Last year, EPA awarded Shoreline Cities Grants totaling just under $7 million to 16 cities with populations greater than 50,000.

"This is an opportunity for more Great Lakes shoreline cities to obtain funding for green infrastructure projects," said Region 5 Administrator/Great Lakes National Program Manager Susan Hedman. "These GLRI grants will be used for green infrastructure projects that reduce urban runoff and sewer overflows that foul beaches and impair Great Lakes water quality."

Cities can use the grants to cover up to 50 percent of the cost of rain gardens, bioswales, green roofs, porous pavement, greenways, constructed wetlands, stormwater tree trenches, and other green infrastructure measures installed on public property. Detailed eligibility requirements are available here.

See also:

"EPA green infrastructure grant to help improve Lake Michigan water quality"

"Great Lakes shoreline cities offered $8.5M in EPA green infrastructure projects"

"Water quality improved at Ohio beaches by Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding"

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