Hunter awards Veolia with largest ever contract to operate water, wastewater treatment plants

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July 1, 2014 -- Hunter Water Corporation has awarded Veolia a contract to operate and maintain 25 of its water and wastewater treatment plants in the Hunter region (New South Wales, Australia).

The €193-million ($263.9-million/AU$279-million) contract, which comes after a 12-month international tender process, is the largest ever awarded by Hunter Water and marks the first time operation and maintenance (O&M) of its plants has been taken to tender.

Under the eight-year contract, Veolia will operate and maintain the plants that supply potable water and wastewater treatment services to over half a million people across six local government areas in New South Wales.

Veolia has been present in Australia for over 20 years and operates more than 30 water treatment plants in Australia and New Zealand. The contract adds to the company's existing presence in the Hunter region, with Veolia partnering with some of the region's biggest companies including Tomago Aluminium, Eraring and Rio Tinto Coal.

Hunter Water is one of Australia's largest water utilities. It provides drinking water and wastewater services to 570,000 residents and customers in the Hunter region.

About Veolia

Veolia specializes in optimized resource management. With over 200,000 employees worldwide, the company designs and provides water, waste and energy management solutions that contribute to the sustainable development of communities and industries. Through its three complementary business activities, Veolia helps to develop access to resources, preserve available resources, and to replenish them. For more information, visit www.veolia.com.

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