New Brunswick communities to receive major wastewater infrastructure improvements

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COVERDALE, NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA, July 25, 2014 -- A number of communities throughout the province of New Brunswick, Canada, will soon receive major improvements to their wastewater infrastructure backed by federal investments made through the federal Gas Tax Fund.

The infrastructure project will comprise seven communities -- Fundy Bay, Gillies, Greensborough, Harvey Lake, Havelock, Roachville, and Sainte-Marie-de-Kent -- that will see upgrades and improvements to their wastewater collection and treatment systems.

The Government of Canada is contributing approximately $10 million to these seven projects through the federal Gas Tax Fund. To date, New Brunswick has received close to $295 million from the fund to improve local infrastructure.

Work will span over several years and will range from upgrading and improving existing systems to constructing new wastewater treatment facilities and systems.

In some areas, additional households will also be connected to the local treatment system. Thanks to these projects, cleaner water will flow into local wells and rivers, such as the Saint John River, the Petitcodiac River, the Kennebecasis River, and the Bouctouche River.

The proper treatment of wastewater ensures the health and safety of families and residents while protecting the environment. Projects like these will contribute to the health and wealth of New Brunswick communities for years to come.

See also: "Canada, New Brunswick invest in water infrastructure"

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