Pacific Institute receives grant to help improve CA drought research, solution efforts

Sponsored by

OAKLAND, CA, Aug. 26, 2014 -- The Bank of America Charitable Foundation has recently donated a $250,000 grant to the Pacific Institute to help address the severe drought and ongoing water challenges in the state of California. The funds will help support the Pacific Institute's drought research and response effort.

The Pacific Institute will analyze the best available data on water supply and demand in California and the potential to reduce demand through water conservation and efficiency, as well as augment supplies through stormwater capture and water reuse. In addition, the Institute will expand tools for improving landscape irrigation and helping residents understand and reduce their water use.

"The severe drought in California necessitates finding a new, innovative approach to addressing the water resource challenges our communities face," said Janet Lamkin, Bank of America's California state president. "Our support for the Pacific Institute is part of a broader response the bank is making to the California drought, beginning earlier this year when we committed $500,000 to help increase the capacity of local food banks to serve agricultural workers who have lost their jobs because of the drought."

The Pacific Institute plans to work in collaboration with a wide range of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and research and communications groups in developing and furthering sustainable water use in California in the face of drought and for the future.

See also:

"CA water authority backs water bond; urges legislators to approve"

"CA district breaks record with public's response to water-saving rebates"


About the Pacific Institute

Our aim is to find real-world solutions to problems like water shortages, habitat destruction, global warming, and environmental injustice. Based in Oakland, California, we conduct research, publish reports, recommend solutions, and work with decision makers, advocacy groups, and the public to change policy. Since our founding in 1987, we’ve become known for independent, innovative thinking that cuts across traditional areas of study. Our interdisciplinary approach not only helps us make connections that others miss, it also enables us to bring opposing groups together to forge effective real-world solutions. For more information, visit www.pacinst.org.

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

Clearing Things Up at Prequannock WTP

In 2010, the city of Newark, N.J., retained Hatch Mott MacDonald to investigate potential solutions to a problem at Pequannock WTP. Decant tanks were providing minimal solids removal as a result of removed tube settlers from deterioration. Inclined plate settlers were identified as a feasible alternative for improving supernatant water quality and were selected for pilot testing.

Be the Change: Embracing New Approaches to Foster Innovation in the Water Industry

The pressure to accommodate change will drive our traditionally risk-averse industry to embrace new and different approaches at an accelerated pace. Further, the demand for a zero-energy footprint will also drive improvements in co-generation efficiencies, energy conservation and recovery methods, and comprehensive resource recovery.

CDC preparing Ebola guidance for wastewater treatment personnel

In a recent conference call with AWWA and other major water organizations, the CDC shared it has prepared and is conducting an expedited internal review of an interim guidance on wastewater worker safety and the inactivation of the Ebola virus by wastewater treatment processes.

New partnership to measure farmers' conservation impacts on U.S. water quality

The U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Department of Agriculture have announced a new partnership that will provide a clearer picture of the benefits of farmers' conservation practices on the quality of the nation's waters. 

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA