CA city WWTP upgrades cut energy costs by 75 percent in new contract

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DALLAS and RIVERBANK, CA, Aug. 25, 2014 -- Today, Schneider Electric, a global specialist in energy management, announced the signing of a $3.9-million energy savings performance contract (ESPC) with the city of Riverbank, Calif., after the city recognized that its existing facultative lagoon system may not comply with anticipated future treatment standards for the state of California. 

Upgrading the existing facultative lagoons through a conventional design/bid/build process would have added an additional 60 percent to project costs. Schneider Electric worked with Riverbank to develop a turnkey retrofit solution for existing lagoons to be upgraded to extended aeration treatment utilizing patented Parkson Corporation Biolac® technology. The project is expected to cut the city's wastewater treatment plant energy use by 75 percent, saving more than $240,000 in annual energy costs with no new taxes or increased fees to residents.

The ESPC project delivery trend is gaining momentum across the U.S. Using the ESPC model, Riverbank and other municipal governments are able to economically implement infrastructure projects by using projected utility cost savings from the project for funding over longer payback periods. The city's self-funded wastewater treatment project is guaranteed to save the city $2 million over the project lifetime.

Accordingly, the project also continues Riverbank's long-term goal to green the city by saving more than 2.5 million kWh each year, which is the equivalent of taking 372 cars off the road or powering 224 houses annually. Additionally, the project is expected to support 37 jobs and produce a total economic impact of $10.7 million.

"The project at the wastewater treatment plant will provide the city a cost-effective means to reduce energy consumption, to make improvements that would otherwise not be feasible and to help move the city into a more sustainable future," said Riverbank Mayor Richard O'Brien. "This project may also put the city in a better position to respond to any new requirements from the State Water Board Regional Quality Control Board."

In the past 22 years, Schneider Electric has successfully implemented over 530 ESPCs across the nation and helped clients around the world, such as the city of Riverbank, save more than $1 billion. ESPCs help publicly-funded entities make capital improvements over longer payback periods. They also offer many long-term benefits such as improved facility efficiency, occupant comfort, financial management, and environmental protection. Typically, new, more efficient equipment and upgraded facility automation systems maximize energy efficiency and generate utility savings.

See also:

"Schneider Electric completes $4.7M energy-efficiency project in MO city"

"Schneider Electric signs $5.7M energy-efficiency project with Texas city"


About Schneider Electric

As a global specialist in energy management with operations in more than 100 countries, Schneider Electric offers integrated solutions across multiple market segments, including leadership positions in Utilities & Infrastructure, Industries & Machines Manufacturers, Non-residential Building, Data Centers & Networks and in Residential. Focused on making energy safe, reliable, efficient, productive and green, the company's 140,000 plus employees achieved sales of 30.8 billion US dollars (24 billion euros) in 2012, through an active commitment to help individuals and organizations make the most of their energy. For more information, visit www.enable.schneider-electric.com.

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