Sewer upgrade in Allonby, Northern England following bathing water issues

Sewer upgrade in Allonby, Northern England following bathing water issues
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Allonby, a tourist hotspot in the North of England, is to receive a multi-million pound upgrade to its sewer system next year as part of United Utilities’ plans to increase the capacity of both the pipes and the sewage works.

Last year Allonby beach failed its bathing water standards. However, according to the utility the sewer system was only a small part of the problem, but said that it is endeavouring to make sure that it doesn’t happen again.

The company added that it is investing heavily in sewerage systems across Cumbria and the North West to improve coastal water quality and habitats.

Two years ago, the firm built a £13 million storm water storage tank at Maryport, which it said has already helped improve bathing water quality in places like Allonby.

The latest upgrades will involve replacing 180 metres of existing sewer under Allonby beach with a larger diameter pipe, and the temporary closure of part of the main beach car park for approximately eight weeks from March.

The extension of the sewage works is expected to allow United Utilities to build extra storage capacity to reduce the likelihood of spills to the sea.

The utility added that additional ultraviolet treatment will also be installed to “zap bugs in any spills that do occur”.

“This is really important work for Allonby and its visitors,” commented project manager, Matt Steer. “As well as vastly reducing the chances of storm water spilling into the sea in the bathing season, we’ll also support the growing tourist industry.”

However, Steer explained that the company cannot work on the beach during winter because it would affect over-wintering birds.

“Getting under way in March helps us keep the disruption to a minimum. Closing the northern car park for a short while will be a pain, but we’ll build a temporary access onto the beach and other car parks are available,” he said.

A public exhibition has been arranged at Allonby Village Hall on August 19, between 3pm and 7pm, for people to drop-in and see the plans and ask engineers questions. Everyone’s welcome. The project will involve installing a new section of pipe on Allonby beach itself.

“We want to reduce the disruption as much as we can so we’d love to hear people’s views,” concluded Steer.

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