USGS scientists publish new papers on water resources information

Sponsored by

Aug. 20, 2014 -- The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) routinely collects a wide range of hydrologic data, assures the quality of this data, and makes historical and continuing records of the nation's water resources freely available in national databases.

Accordingly, USGS scientists have recently published two separate papers that provide national overviews of the status of USGS water resources information in the context of historical and technical developments in the last half-century.

In the report "Past, Present, and Future of Water Data Delivery from the U.S. Geological Survey", Robert M. Hirsch and Gary T. Fisher (retired) noted that USGS innovations, aided by rapidly-improving technology, have enabled a transition in recent years from paper reports to online reports and from daily data to instantaneous data.

An increasing emphasis on national and international data standards and web services makes it possible for users in the water management and research communities to quickly and easily import USGS water data into the operational and scientific software tools that they use. Further, distributing water data with applications on new mobile platforms brings value to new and nontraditional consumers of hydrologic information.

Likewise, USGS Chief Scientist for Water Jerad D. Bales reviewed 1974 predictions in the May 2014 edition of Water Resources Impact about how water data would be collected in the future and how those predictions have been fulfilled or altered. He also described factors, both technical and otherwise, affecting changes in water resources data collection and management, as well as future challenges for water data collection.

See also:

"USGS celebrates 50th anniversary of Water Resources Research Act"

"USGS to grant states $43M for outdoor developments through Land, Water Conservation Fund"

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

Online Zeta Potential Measurement Provides Water Treatment Control, Cost Reduction

Online zeta potential measurements can provide real-time water quality monitoring and support effective process control under all circumstances. The value of online measurement is illustrated through the experiences of Aurora Water, which is using zeta potential at one facility as both an offline and online tool for monitoring and controlling water treatment processes.

Pacific Institute issues helpful analysis of CA water bond to better inform Nov voters

Voters on CA's November ballot will be asked whether to approve Proposition 1, the Water Quality, Supply and Infrastructure Improvement Act. As such, the Pacific Institute has released an objective new report that helps voters untangle the complexities of the water bond measure.

Research offers unique insight into monitoring groundwater at Ohio fracking sites

A new research project at the University of Cincinnati is taking a groundbreaking approach to monitoring groundwater resources near fracking sites in the state of Ohio.

EPA announces preliminary determination to regulate strontium in drinking water

EPA has announced that it has officially made a preliminary determination to regulate strontium in U.S. drinking water. Strontium is a naturally occurring element that, at elevated levels, can impact bone strength in individuals who do not consume enough calcium.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA