USGS scientists publish new papers on water resources information

Sponsored by

Aug. 20, 2014 -- The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) routinely collects a wide range of hydrologic data, assures the quality of this data, and makes historical and continuing records of the nation's water resources freely available in national databases.

Accordingly, USGS scientists have recently published two separate papers that provide national overviews of the status of USGS water resources information in the context of historical and technical developments in the last half-century.

In the report "Past, Present, and Future of Water Data Delivery from the U.S. Geological Survey", Robert M. Hirsch and Gary T. Fisher (retired) noted that USGS innovations, aided by rapidly-improving technology, have enabled a transition in recent years from paper reports to online reports and from daily data to instantaneous data.

An increasing emphasis on national and international data standards and web services makes it possible for users in the water management and research communities to quickly and easily import USGS water data into the operational and scientific software tools that they use. Further, distributing water data with applications on new mobile platforms brings value to new and nontraditional consumers of hydrologic information.

Likewise, USGS Chief Scientist for Water Jerad D. Bales reviewed 1974 predictions in the May 2014 edition of Water Resources Impact about how water data would be collected in the future and how those predictions have been fulfilled or altered. He also described factors, both technical and otherwise, affecting changes in water resources data collection and management, as well as future challenges for water data collection.

See also:

"USGS celebrates 50th anniversary of Water Resources Research Act"

"USGS to grant states $43M for outdoor developments through Land, Water Conservation Fund"

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

VIDEO: Desalination global news round-up

Join WWi Chief Editor Tom Freyberg for a round-up of the latest desalination industry news from the last two weeks. Watch the video for the full stories…

Maryland WWTP's new solar array to serve as state's largest municipally-owned system

Standard Solar is set to install a 2.1-megawatt ground-mount solar system in Pocomoke City, Md., at the city's wastewater treatment facility. Once completed this December, it will be the largest municipally-owned system in the state.

Major Texas company to pay $1.6M civil penalty for CWA oil spill violations

The Department of Justice and the EPA have announced that Superior Crude Gathering has agreed to pay a civil penalty for alleged violations of the Clean Water Act stemming from a crude oil spill in 2010 from tanks at the company's oil storage facility in the town of Ingleside, Texas.

Bureau of Reclamation makes WaterSMART grants available to improve water, energy conservation

The Bureau of Reclamation is inviting states, tribes, water and irrigation districts, and other water- and power-related organizations to apply for funding to cost-share on projects that conserve and use water more efficiently, increase renewable energy use and improve energy efficiency.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA