World’s largest wastewater recycling plant coming to Sydney, Australia

World’s largest wastewater recycling plant coming to Sydney, Australia
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A new partnership between the private sector and Sydney Water at a new residential and commercial building development is expected to save one million litres of water per day by recycling wastewater in Australia.

The development at Sydney’s Central Park Broadway will feature a wastewater recycling facility at the on the site of the old Carlton Brewery at Broadway. According to Sydney Water it is the largest project of its kind in the world and will set the standard for water reuse and efficiency in new developments across Sydney.

“Under this partnership, the operator, Central Park Water, will source drinking water from Sydney Water and supply it to more than 2,000 residential apartments and 75,000 square metres of commercial and retail space at Central Park,” explained  minister for natural resources, lands and water in the New South Wales government, Kevin Humphries.

According to Humphries the water recycling facility on the site collects and treats the sewage and wastewater, then distributes recycled water for various uses including the flushing of toilets, cold water clothes washing and car washing, which makes up 50% of traditional potable water use.

“The water is also used to irrigate the 170 metre vertical garden - claimed to be the largest of its kind in the southern hemisphere. The garden is said to counteract the urban heat island effect and contribute to a more sustainable urban design.

Humphries added the scheme is an excellent example of how the private and public sector can work together to deliver integrated water solutions to the market that benefit both customers and the urban environment.

“The current changes to the Water Industry Competition Act before Parliament are aimed at ensuring we have a level playing field that enables more efficient, reliable and sustainable projects like this one that have real social, financial and environmental benefits,” concluded the minister.

Terry Leckie, managing director of Flow Systems, the operator of Central Park Water explained that the company was under contract to supply sustainable water solutions for 25,000 dwellings and 800,000 square meters of commercial premises across eight communities in Sydney and the Hunter Valley.

Sydney Water general manager of customer services, Paul Freeman added: “The Central Park project is an excellent example of Sydney Water working cooperatively with the private sector to drive innovation and efficiency to benefit NSW water users.”

“In this case the operator is licenced under the Water Industry Competition Act and is both our customer and a fellow water utility in its own right, supplying its own customers – the residents of Central Park,” concluded Freeman.

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