NanoH2O changes name to LG NanoH2O in new acquisition

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EL SEGUNDO, CA, Sept. 1, 2014 -- NanoH2O, a manufacturer of efficient and cost-effective reverse osmosis (RO) membranes for seawater desalination, has completed the legal filing to officially change its operating name to "LG NanoH2O Inc."

The filing follows the company's recent acquisition by Korean chemical giant, LG Chem, Ltd. Founded in 2005, NanoH2O introduced the industry's first thin-film nanocomposite (TFN) RO membrane, which features benign nanoparticles designed to increase membrane productivity and salt rejection.

"Customers will see a surge in commercial growth and product development from LG NanoH2O," said LG NanoH2O President Chul Nam, "along with enhanced customer and technical support from our growing network of offices, representatives and distributors."

The company's sale was finalized on April 30, 2014. In addition, LG NanoH2O debuts a new corporate logo, and its website can now be found at: www.lg-nanoh2o.com.

See also:

"NanoH2O confirms takeover by LG Chem"

"NanoH2O wins prestigious Patrick Soon-Shiong Innovation Award for membrane technology"


About LG NanoH2O

LG NanoH2O designs, develops, manufactures and markets RO mem­branes that lower the cost of desalination. Based on breakthrough nanostructured materials and industry-proven polymer technology, the company's RO membranes dramatically improve desalination energy efficiency and productivity. LG NanoH2O seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, Standard 61 certified by NSF International for the production of drinking water, deliver the highest flux and the highest salt rejection of any SWRO membrane on the market. LG NanoH2O is headquartered in Los Angeles, Calif., and is a wholly-owned company of LG Chem, Ltd. For more information, visit www.lg-nanoh2o.com.

About LG Chem

LG Chem, Ltd. is a globally diversified chemical company which operates three main business units: Petrochemicals, IT & Electronic Materials, and Energy Solution. The chemical business manufactures a wide range of products, from petrochemical goods to high-value added plastics. It also extends its chemical expertise into high-tech areas such as electronic materials, water desalination and rechargeable batteries for electric vehicles and ESS. For more information, visit www.lgchem.com.

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