Joint Partnership Works to Recycle Frac Water

Sponsored by

A new joint partnership has been formed to provide a solution to the environmental issues surrounding the treatment of mineral-laden brackish water from Marcellus Shale drilling, a problem that has threatened to severely limit natural gas drilling in several northeastern states.

The partnership is between Casella Waste Systems, based in Rutland, VT, and Altela, a privately held water desalination company in Albuquerque, NM. Together, these two companies have partnered to solve the environmental issue of brackish, salty water produced from drilling for natural gas in the Marcellus Shale basin that until recently was often discharged into area rivers, with little or no treatment for hard-to-remove salt contaminants.

The newly formed joint partnership, “Casella-Altela Regional Environmental Services, LLC,” or “CARES,” will recycle brackish oilfield and natural gas wastewater into clean distilled water for future use by the industry. The cleaned water is the same quality as rainwater and can be recycled and reused by the oil and gas industry.

As part of the joint partnership, Altela will provide the technology to clean the brackish water to a quality higher than state and federal standards, while Casella will provide the working infrastructure and operational facilities for the treatment facility.

The first water treatment facility will be located at the Casella-owned landfill located in McKean County, PA. The placement of the treatment facility at the McKean landfill provides a platform to provide a full suite of resource solutions to the drilling companies, including storage for brackish and clean water. The water treatment facility will be powered by energy generated by methane gas captured from the landfill.

Since the McKean site is adjacent to an existing rail spur, the facility will enable both the transport of large volumes of frac flowback water to the site, and then clean treated water back to its customers throughout Pennsylvania and New York. This will minimize truck traffic to the facility, and reduce truck traffic throughout PA.

 

More Industrial WaterWorld Articles
Past IWW Issues

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

City of Lima, Ohio, enters CWA settlement to reduce critical sewage overflows

To resolve claims that untreated sewer discharges were released into the Ottawa River during wet weather, the city of Lima, Ohio, has entered into a Clean Water Act settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Justice and State of Ohio.

AWWA to Congress: Nutrient pollution reduction key to preventing cyanotoxins

In a testimony recently held before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, American Water Works Association President John Donahue stressed that the solution to keeping drinking water safe from cyanotoxins begins with reducing nutrient pollution.

Reclamation invests $9.2M in water, power research in West amid drought

Following a year of record drought, water managers throughout the West are searching for information and ideas to ensure a reliable and sustainable water supply. To meet this growing need, the Bureau of Reclamation has officially awarded $9.2 million for 131 research projects.

City of Philadelphia names first 'Stormwater Pioneer'

The Philadelphia Water Department has named Stanley's True Value Hardware as the city's first Stormwater Pioneer. The store's third-generation owners were recognized as role models for small business owners and private developers looking to reduce stormwater runoff.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA