Water quality probes

Sponsored by
smarTROLL™ Handheld Instruments

In-Situ® Inc. announced two new water quality handheld probes for the environmental market. Environmental professionals can use the new smarTROLL™ Handheld Instruments to spot-check natural surface waters and effluent waters and to conduct groundwater quality sampling. The unique iSitu™ App, designed to run on iPhone®, iPod touch® or iPad®, makes it easy for users to email data instantly to their contacts, tag sites with photos and GPS coordinates, quickly calibrate sensors, and log data to their smartphones. By using readily-available smartphone technology instead of proprietary meters, environmental professionals reduce their overall cost of ownership. In-Situ's water quality sensors are extremely durable, hold calibrations for long periods of time and require minimal maintenance. For example, In-Situ's optical dissolved oxygen sensor (RDO® Sensor) withstands daily use, requires infrequent calibration and uses EPA- approved methods. NPDES permit holders can use both probes for reporting purposes.

In-Situ Inc.
www.in-situ.com

Sponsored by

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