Chlorine Dioxide Generator Eliminates Fouling-Related Maintenance Downtime

Sponsored by

The Huntsville, TX, plant uses a chlorine dioxide generator designed and manufactured by Sabre Oxidation Technologies.
Click here to enlarge image

The operations and maintenance manager at a 15 mgd regional drinking water plant in Huntsville, TX, a long-term user of chlorine dioxide for taste and odor control, reports that installation of a new chlorine dioxide generator has eliminated fouling-related maintenance downtime, while providing for further reliability improvement on account of its more "user-friendly" configuration.

The new Sabre Chlorine Dioxide Generator was designed and manufactured by Sabre Oxidation Technologies of Odessa, TX. Separate rotometers are used for sodium chlorite and chlorine gas, which are educted under vacuum through a mix chamber, where chlorine dioxide is formed.

"With the generators previously being included in the competitive bidding process, we had used virtually every chlorine dioxide generator since we started with that treatment program around 1986," said Keith Bass, Operations & Maintenance Chief for Southern Region Support Services, Trinity River Authority of Texas. "Now we've settled on this generator, with the bidding process limited to the chemicals."

"This new design has eliminated fouling in the throat and nozzle of the vessel where the chemicals are mixed. With previous generators we used, this fouling was happening every three to five days, causing downtime of a half hour to an hour for cleaning that sometimes required disassembling."

"It's also the most user-friendly unit we've had. You could teach a five-year-old how to use it in a matter of minutes. The other configurations were much more complex."

The 23-year-old plant sends all of its 15 mgd output to the City of Huntsville, its only customer. About 8 mgd is distributed for drinking water, including a seven mile pipeline for two prison farms, and the balance sent through a 30 mile pipeline to a power plant for cooling water.

Chlorine dioxide treatment was originally installed, upstream of clarification and filtration, to combat a serious algae problem on the clarifier basin, which derived from elimination of free chlorine that was needed to comply with trihalomethane(THM) limits per EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act.

Original dose of 5 ppm "helped a lot" with taste and odor problems related to the algal growth. When new rules mandated less than 1 ppm chlorite, chlorine dioxide feed was reduced to 2 ppm, and was still very effective. Current usage is said to still be driven by those "aesthetic" problems.

"This biogrowth maintenance is needed to prevent the clarifier basins from being overrun, which would decrease filtration efficiency, and increase the need for backwashing," Bass said. "While that probably wouldn't threaten our compliance, it certainly wouldn't be good for visitors to see."

Sabre generators are deployed at the raw water intake at the river, and also 300 yards from the plant, which is 4.5 miles from the river. Each is capable of delivering 300 lb/day of chlorine dioxide, at a maximum rate of 2.5 ppm, and probably averaging about 1.5 ppm annually. Only the generator near the plant is needed for most of the year. Daily production per generator ranges from 75-300 lbs, and averages about 125 lbs. A third generator is deployed at the Authority's 3 mgd Livingston Plant, at the intake from Lake Livingston.

The Sabre Chlorine Dioxide Generator features an "Integral Component Block Mounted (Solid State)" design that eliminates the need for extensive external tubes and valves and associated spare parts, promoting greater efficiency, improved performance, and minimized maintenance.

Its patented Tuned Reaction Column™ is said to eliminate clogging and insure a steady stream of precursor chemicals - allowing the unit to operate efficiently at lower water flows without variation in meter reading and with a greater turndown ratio, and without need for frequent flushing, disassembly, or cleaning.

Chlorine dioxide is generated at a minimum of 95% efficiency, with no more than 5% excess chlorine. Typical systems produce 10 to 1000 lbs/day. Systems with capacities up to 100,000 lbs./day are available.

Sabre Oxidation Technologies was started in 1995, with key experts who have now worked together on applications of chlorine dioxide and other oxidants for over 15 years. It is currently operating in the energy and environmental technology markets as well as in water treatment applications.

For further information, visit the company's website at www.sabretechnologies.com.

Sponsored by

Did You Like this Article? Get All the Water Industry News Delivered to Your Inbox or Mailbox

Subscribe to one of our magazines or email newsletters today at no cost and receive the latest information.

TODAY'S HEADLINES

AWWA provides free tools in new online Cyanotoxins Resource Community website

Through a collaborative effort with Hazen and Sawyer and Utah State University, the American Water Works Association has provided several free tools in its new online Cyanotoxins Resource Community. 

North Las Vegas wastewater treatment plant upgraded with MBR technology

As part of an upgrade to its wastewater treatment plant, the city of North Las Vegas, Nev., has implemented a high-performance membrane bioreactor technology from GE.

Reclamation awards $1.49M for nine desalination, water purification research projects

The Bureau of Reclamation recently announced that it has selected nine projects across the United States to receive $1.49 million under its Desalination and Water Purification Research Program. The funding will support almost $13.5 million in research.

Xylem providing dewatering pumps for Panama Canal Expansion Program

The Panama Canal Expansion Program is receiving heavy-duty dewatering pumps from Xylem to fill the third set of basin locks on the Pacific Ocean sector with 1.7 billion gallons of water, as part of performance trials for the system prior to its commissioning.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

  

 


© 2015. PennWell Corporation. All Rights Reserved. PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS AND CONDITIONS