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VirtualH20 - September 13, 2011 Archives

Below are the presentations that were offered at Virtual H2O - September 13, 2011. Click on the image to launch the presentation. Flash Player required.

Please note: A Certificate of Attendance will not be issued for courses taken here.

Drinking Water Treatment

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Membrane Degassing to Remove Dissolved Hydrogen Sulfide
Dr. Rakesh Govind, President, PRD Tech, Inc.
Biogenic hydrogen sulfide is often present in drinking water and it imparts a bad taste and smell to the water. Compared to tray aeration, the traditional method of removing this dissolved gas, membrane degassing can achieve very high removal efficiencies with no chemical addition, low pressure drop and several other advantages, which will be discussed.

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Evaluation of Ceramic Membranes, A Cutting-Edge Water Treatment Technology
Sunil Kommineni, Malcolm Pirnie/ARCADIS
Historically, low-pressure membranes (microfiltration and ultrafiltration) used in water treatment have been made of polymeric material. More recently, membranes made of ceramic materials (oxides of aluminum, titanium, and zirconium) have been developed for water treatment. This presentation will include a discussion of ceramic membranes, comparison of ceramic and polymeric membranes, and application of ceramic membranes for treatment of recycle streams of conventional water treatment plants. The presentation will include conceptual design, footprint and cost opinions.

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Industrial Wastewater Reuse

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Produced Water Treatment in the Unconventional Gas Industry
Jenna Manuszak and Brent Alspach, Malcolm Pirnie
To harness natural gas reserves, oil & gas companies are investing heavily in the development of new wells, where gas is extracted via hydraulic fracturing. However, water management has become a limiting factor in this process. This presentation will discuss various options for produced water treatment, including candidate processes within each of the following treatment steps: oil-water separation, chemical precipitation & clarification, filtration, TDS removal, brine management, solids dewatering, and other advanced treatment processes. Technical considerations and order of magnitude costs will be presented for each technology.

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Enhanced Water Conservation, Chemistry Reduction and Water Re-Use Opportunities for Open Loop HVAC Water Treatment
Rodrigo Romo, Zeta Corp
Evaporative cooling systems represent one of the largest water using components of any facility and have traditionally been operated under chemical water treatment programs. Under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, the US Army Corps of Engineers' Engineering Research & Development Center–Construction Engineering Research Laboratory and Zeta Corporation evaluated a water management program based on application of high voltage, capacitor-based technology on cooling towers at four different military installations. The sites selected for the project covered a wide range of make up water quality. The four-year study monitored side-by-side installations of the technology, operating without any chemicals, against the results of a standard chemical water treatment program. This presentation will highlight results from all four sites.

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Urban Water Management

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How to Increase Your PAY! Site Conditions and Design Decisions Profoundly Affect Pollutant Removal Levels
John Moll, Crystal Stream Technologies
In this presentation, 11 years of accumulated data from over 6,000 field cleaning and maintenance operations for manufactured BMPs will be examined to learn what factors affect the performance of those BMPs. The author will look at parameters such as the method of sizing flow-based BMPs, the effect of bypassing certain flows, the overall basin size, the amount of impervious surface, and the arrangement of BMPs in a treatment train (who should go first?), based on field results – not on theory. This presentation will provide the antidote for the age-old paradox: "It sure looked good on paper."

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Energy Efficiency

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Hydropower for Municipal Water Systems
Todd Briggeman, Black & Veatch
For centuries water flow in streams and rivers has been harnessed to generate power. However, this energy is not just confined to rivers and streams. There are many conduit hydropower opportunities throughout the water distribution infrastructure in the US. This harnessing of wasted energy can provide true energy cost savings and improved overall system efficiency for water systems. This paper will focus on conduit hydropower as it relates to the water industry. Four of the basic opportunities present within a typical water distribution system will be reviewed. The old and new technologies currently available for hydropower recovery will be discussed with emphasis on cutting edge technology introduced in the last two years. The remainder of the paper will briefly touch on basic requirements and pitfalls in the feasibility analysis for potential sites and some of the challenges presented by the permitting process.

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Wastewater Treatment

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Optimizing Denitrification at Wastewater Treatment Plants
Heather Phillips and James Barnard, Black & Veatch
Biological denitrification of wastewater has been a topic of interest for several decades; however, recent nutrient reduction initiatives and the need to achieve limit-of-technology (LOT) effluent quality have revamped interest in denitrification rate research and alternative carbon sources. This presentation will discuss operating parameters which affect denitrification, from the obvious (mixed liquor recycle rate, dissolved oxygen set-points) to the not-so-obvious (solids retention time, alternative carbon sources, sidestream management). Case studies will be presented in which operations models, developed from quick, simple tests gaging anoxic zone performance, were used to minimize operating costs. In the examples discussed, plant operators use the design models to bridge the gap between the consultants' efforts and real-world utility management.

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Comparative Analysis of the Glendale Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant in Lakeland, FL, Using Bioaugmentation
Rich Schici, In-Pipe Technology
The City of Lakeland, Florida selected bioaugmentation in 2001 to treat odor and corrosion in a partial section of the collection system. The test was successful and so the City elected to expand the program to other select sewer areas. Over three years, bioaugmentation expanded to cover the entire sewer system, an area of about 100 square miles. This paper compares plant performance using operating data from 2009, after the technology was in place continuously for nine years, to 2000, prior to the start of bioaugmentation. The evaluation of plant influent conditions and performance operating three trains in 2000 versus two trains in 2009 is examined in detail using an independent statistician. The approach focuses on the following areas of impact: load reduction, plant capacity, nutrient removal, and sludge reduction.

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Package MBR Systems for Remote Decentralized Application
John Dragasevich, Filter Innovations
Typical centralized wastewater treatment systems are not feasible for remote wastewater treatment applications, driving increased interest in package wastewater treatment solutions for remote decentralized areas. Package plants often need to meet very specific requirements such as stringent effluent quality limits, transportability, operator availability and varying climate conditions. Membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology is well suited for package systems due to its competitiveness in effluent quality, size compactness and flexibility in operation. The presentation will discuss the different key design features to be considered for package MBR systems. Two case studies will be examined: a gold mining camp in Northern Ontario, Canada, and an installation in Arctic climate conditions.

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Asset Management

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Trends in Actual Wall Thickness for Cast & Ductile Water Mains
Sonya Semanuik, PICA Corp, Canada
Many utilities have traditionally based their water main rehabilitation and replacement programs on failure histories and the age of their pipelines. As the age of infrastructure continues to increase, this methodology will become cost-prohibitive. Based on Direct Condition Assessment results for small diameter cast and ductile iron water mains, this paper discusses trends in actual wall loss, which show -- perhaps surprisingly -- that age may not be an accurate indicator of pipeline condition.

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Cost-Effective Condition Assessment
Bryon Livingston, Black & Veatch
The purpose of a condition assessment plan is to develop a program to replace the "right" pipe at the "right" time with the "right" material -- an R3 approach. There are many technologies available for determining the existing condition of the pipeline and knowing which ones to use can be a difficult decision. This presentation describes how several technologies are used in a case study to complement each other in collecting data to evaluate the remaining service life of a pipeline. The author will also discuss how other technologies can be combined to provide cost-effective condition assessment.

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Water Utility Operations

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Second Annual Water Dialogue Workshop Series: "Economic Pressures" Roundtable Results
Daniel McCarthy, Black & Veatch
This year's annual Water Dialogue series focused on "Economic Pressures: How are we adapting and leading in these difficult times?" Dan McCarthy, President and CEO of Black & Veatch's global water business, will present a summary of the findings from this year's Water Dialogue series. Like the discussions last year on "Overcoming Barriers to Water Reuse," this thought-leadership series of conversations included participants from around the world with a wide range of opinions and experiences to share. The author will discuss their most pressing concerns, including finding and implementing new revenue streams, making being greener more profitable, determining the best source or mix of new and established financing options, and more.

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5 Tricks to Lean Water Operations: Transforming data into information is critical to success
Chuck Scholpp, Hach Company
With the many challenges facing the water/wastewater industry -- tight budgets and aging workforce to name a few -- data collection needs to be simplified. By applying a lean approach to water operations, the water/wastewater industry may have the solution it needs to streamline processes while cutting costs. This means automating processes, utilizing technology and ultimately, optimizing the business. This presentation will discuss five tricks for implementing lean operations and offer four specific water utility examples of how these organizations are implementing lean practices to increase their overall productivity and efficiency.

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Security

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To React Or Not To React. Addressing Early Warning System Alarms
Dan Kroll, Hach Company
The concept of utilizing the measurement of multiple bulk parameters to recognize and identify water quality excursions is rapidly gaining ground as the method of choice for on-line water quality monitoring. These monitoring systems may or may not be equipped with event detection software to help in interpreting signals that indicate potential water quality anomalies. With or without software, all of these systems have some potential to generate false alarms. In this presentation, the author will discuss how to address and eliminate possible sources of error in a systematic and focused manner.

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Water Utility Security: Keep It Simple
James McGowan, Videx Inc.
Security is essential to today's water utility operations. Water utilities are seeking solutions that will allow them to secure their perimeters, track the movements of individuals, and prevent unauthorized access to their physical assets. The primary challenge is to raise overall security without impeding daily operations. With today's advances in security technology and an abundance of products from which to choose, utilities must have clearly defined goals. This presentation will address the things to consider when evaluating an access control solution and how it will affect daily operations. Strategies for gaining acceptance throughout the utility organization will also be discussed.ies to promote water reuse.

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Exhibitor List

AIRVAC
Degremont
E/One
GE Power & Water
IPEX
Motion Computing
Ovivo
PennWell Books / PennEnergy
SWAN - Smart Water Networks Forum
Thermo Scientific
Vaughan
WaterWorld
WaterWorld Middle East