CDA comments on proposed EPA LCRI ruling

April 3, 2024
The Copper Development Association submits comment on the EPA's proposed regulations for lead and copper improvements.

The CDA comments on the LCRI

The Copper Development Association (CDA) has submitted comments on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPAs) National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for Lead and Copper Improvements (LCRI).

The CDA expressed its support for the proposal of eliminating harmful lead service lines (LSL) and galvanized requiring replacement (GRR) service lines across the country. The CDA stated the importance of longstanding use of copper and copper alloy products in water delivery applications. The CDA also stressed the importance of these materials in federally funded infrastructure products.

The CDA’s comments on the LCRI focus on the replacement of GRR’s citing the recyclability and impermeability of copper, and its resilience to corrosion.

Stating in a press release the CDA says that copper is the preferred alternate material for water service due to its safety, reliability and sustainability. The press release states that cities such as Flint, Denver and Chicago have all made a commitment to using copper service lines.

The CDA also made comments on the need for specific federal funding for the substantial investment of replacing lead and galvanized service lines. The CDA stated that it’s important to secure funding for disadvantaged communities as well.

The CDA states in the press release that replacing lead and galvanized service lines is the most cost-effective way to ensure long-term access to safe and clean drinking water.

The association stated that they support the EPA’s position against lining and coating technologies as a solution to lead exposure. Instead, they prefer filters for temporary use until full replacement can happen.

The press release states that the CDA commends the EPA for their efforts in addressing lead issues in drinking water. They expressed their commitment to being a continued resource for the EPA.

Background on the EPA’s LCRI

The EPA proposed new ruling for the National Drinking Water Regulations for Lead and Copper: Improvements (LCRI) on December 6, 2023.

These are proposed revisions to the National Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR) for lead and copper, and falls under the authority of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA).

The revisions include a requirement of water systems to replace lead service lines, remover lead trigger level, reduce the lead action level to 0.010 mg/L and strengthen the sampling procedures.

The proposed rule also provides improvements in corrosion control treatment, public education and consumer awareness, requirements for small systems and sampling un schools and childcare facilities.

Comments closed February 5, 2024.

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