Macedonia celebrates World Water Monitoring Day

World Water Monitoring Day drew participants from the Balkan Peninsula as Molika, an organization from Macedonia, reports its efforts to assess water quality in the country which lies north of Greece...

World Water Monitoring Day drew participants from the Balkan Peninsula as Molika, an organization from Macedonia, reports its efforts to assess water quality in the country which lies north of Greece.

SKOPJE, Macedonia, Oct. 21, 2005 -- World Water Monitoring Day drew participants from the Balkan Peninsula as Molika, an organization from Macedonia, reports its efforts to assess water quality in the country which lies north of Greece.

The 2005 monitoring window for World Water Monitoring Day -- which was founded by the America's Clean Water Foundation in Washington, D.C. -- began on Sept. 18. Results from monitoring may be recorded anytime through Dec. 18.

"Our organization -- Movement for the environment 'Molika,' Republic of Macedonia, have already participated in the WWMD 2004. Since we have the WWMD kit, we did many measurements with our members through the past year. For this year's WWMD, we went to the National Park Pelister, which is above our city and we measured a stream," said Nikolce Markovski, Molika vice president.

Markovski can be reached at +389 47 232 469 or molika@mt.net.mk.

On Oct. 18, citizens of the global community joined together to celebrate World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD), a worldwide opportunity to positively impact the health of rivers, lakes, estuaries and other water bodies. Volunteer monitoring groups, water quality agencies, students, and the general public were invited to test four key indicators of water quality: temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity.

World Water Monitoring Day grew out of the Year of Clean Water, which commemorated the 30th anniversary of the U.S. Clean Water Act. In 2002, all 50 states participated in the fledging effort. In 2003, 24 countries joined the effort; 2004 saw more than 50 countries participating; and, in 2005, America's Clean Water Foundation's president Roberta Savage indicated that the number of participating countries ought to climb to over 75.

"World Water Monitoring Day was designed to bring together persons of all colors, faiths, beliefs, economic backgrounds together to monitor the quality of our global water resources," Savage said. "Events have taken place in countries throughout the world and we are delighted to see this volunteer effort grow, year after year."

For more information log on to www.worldwatermonitoringday.org.

###

More in Home