Black & Veatch-led team completes stormwater management research

Black & Veatch Corp. announced completion of a three-year study of Best Management Practices (BMPs) and Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) that will enhance understanding of stormwater quality management technologies and issues in the United States and the United Kingdom. The study was collectively funded by the Water Environment Research Foundation, United Kingdom Water Industry Research and the Awwa Research Foundation...

KANSAS CITY, MO, Oct. 19, 2005 -- Black & Veatch Corp. announced completion of a three-year study of Best Management Practices (BMPs) and Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) that will enhance understanding of stormwater quality management technologies and issues in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Changes in land use associated with urbanization can alter the volume and quality of stormwater runoff. BMPs and SUDS are measures used in the United States and the United Kingdom, respectively, to reduce adverse impacts to receiving waters. The study, collectively funded by the Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF), United Kingdom Water Industry Research (UKWIR) and the Awwa Research Foundation (AwwaRF), was launched to obtain more detailed information associated with selected BMPs and SUDS. Professionals from Black & Veatch led teams in both countries in support of the effort that will improve overall stormwater quality management.

"The study demonstrates how experts from both countries effectively collaborated to deliver a report that advances our practical knowledge of stormwater management techniques and costs," said WERF Research Program Director Jeff Moeller.

In addition to Black & Veatch, the United Kingdom research team included H.R. Wallingford, Ltd., and the Urban Water Technology Centre at the University of Abertay, Dundee, Scotland. The United States team included the Center for Research in Water Resources of the University of Texas in Austin and Austin-based Glenrose Engineering.

"The collective expertise and efforts have produced a report that will yield international benefits," said Black & Veatch Project Director Les Lampe, Ph.D, who is also the Black & Veatch Water Resources Director. According to Matthew Nott, Environment Business Director for B&V Water-Europe, the research and resulting report significantly contribute to the company's global goal of leading the industry in value creation.

Participants conducted an extensive review of the scientific literature and a survey of existing information on BMPs and SUDS, then performed in-depth assessment of the performance, maintenance requirements and whole-life costs of selected BMPs/SUDS. Evaluation focused on retention ponds, extended detention basins, vegetated swales, bioretention systems, porous pavement and infiltration facilities.

The study also resulted in the development of a whole-life cost model that demonstrates that the level of maintenance had a pronounced effect on whole-life costs for most facilities. Also, in many jurisdictions, vegetation management dominated the maintenance activities rather than sediment, debris and trash removal, or structural repair.

The report, Performance and Whole Life Costs of Best Management Practices and Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems, is now available from the Water Environment Research Foundation (www.werf.org).

"The research results will be of great value to all of our stormwater agencies, particularly in determining the whole-life costs of stormwater management facilities," said UKWIR Director Michael Farrimond, Ph.D. UKWIR is planning a one day workshop in London on November 29, where delegates will be able to hear experts from Black & Veatch and HR Wallingford discuss the material. Attendees will also see the whole-life cost model in action. Additional information about both the workshop and the report are available through the UKWIR website (www.ukwir.org).

Black & Veatch Corp. (www.bv.com) is a leading global engineering, consulting and construction company specializing in infrastructure development in energy, water, information and government markets. Founded in 1915, it develops tailored infrastructure solutions that meet clients' needs and provide sustainable benefits. Solutions include conceptual and preliminary engineering services, engineering design, procurement, construction, financial management, asset management, information technology, environmental, security design and consulting, and management consulting services. The employee-owned company has over 90 offices worldwide. It's ranked on the Forbes "500 Largest Private Companies in the United States" listing for 2004.

B&V Water, the water business of Black & Veatch Corp., provides innovative, technology-based solutions to utilities, governments and industries worldwide. Local project teams work in conjunction with a global team of water and wastewater treatment process experts to address site-specific challenges through a broad range of consulting, study, planning, design, design-build and construction management services.

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In other B&V news:
-- CCWD receives patent for new approach to water treatment -- Reduces disinfection byproduct, bromate -- CONCORD, CA, Oct. 6, 2005 -- The Contra Costa Water District (CCWD) has received a patent for a new approach to water treatment using chlorine dioxide in combination with ozone for disinfecting water. CCWD cooperated in this patent effort with AWWARF, CEC, and Black and Veatch, to assure that the potentially significant discovery would remain in the public domain, and available to all water utilities at no royalty costs...

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