Water agencies assess financial future at 3-day conference

The Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA) is gearing up for its annual spring conference, which will focus this year on the state's budget crisis, water transfers, the Colorado River, desalination and many other timely issues.

SACRAMENTO, Calif., March 10, 2003 -- The Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA) is gearing up for its annual spring conference, which will focus this year on the state's budget crisis, water transfers, the Colorado River, desalination and many other timely issues.

The conference, titled "Financing Our Water Future: An Issue of Dollars and Sense," is set for Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, May 7-9, 2003, in South Lake Tahoe.

ACWA's 2003 Spring Conference will address a number of challenges that California water agencies currently face, and through thought-provoking discussions, will facilitate the development of creative solutions. In addition to the track programs, ACWA's Issue Forums also provide attendees with vital information about ongoing matters. The Issue Forums on tap for the Spring Conference include:

• "A New Fiscal Blueprint for California's Future: How will Local Government Fare?"
• "Colorado River 4.4 Plan: Do We Need a Transfer?"
• "Is Desalination the Answer or Just Wishful Thinking?"
• "Water Storage: Who Benefits and Who Should Pay?"
• "Whose Water is it Anyway? The Battle Between Federal, State and Local Governments on Water Rights"

The conference will feature presentations by various state and federal officials, as well as public policy and topic experts. Assemblymember Joseph Canciamilla (D- Pittsburg) has confirmed that he will present the keynote speech, titled "Canciamilla Legislative Reform Plan," during the Thursday lunch.

WHO: Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA)

WHAT: "Financing Our Water Future: An Issue of Dollars and Sense," A three-day conference

WHEN: Wednesday-Friday, May 7-9, 2003

WHERE: South Lake Tahoe, Calif.

ACWA is a statewide association whose 440 members are responsible for about 90% of the water delivered in California. For more information, visit www.acwanet.com

More in Home