More than 1 million still await power restoration after Isabel

More than a million residents and businesses from the Carolinas to New York are still without power as Hurricane Isabel's floodwaters begin to recede.

Water plants coming back on-line as power is restored

RICHMOND, Va., Sept. 22, 2003 -- More than a million residents and businesses from the Carolinas to New York are still without power as Hurricane Isabel's floodwaters begin to recede. Some regions are seeing their fifth day without power, a frustrating realization for many residents who are trying to restore normal life.

At its peak, the storm cut power to more than 6 million from the Carolinas to New York, reported The Daily Press in Hampton Roads, Va. By Sunday morning, that figure had been whittled to about 1.8 million.

The storm caused at least 33 deaths, and North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland and Delaware were declared federal disaster areas, the Associated Press reported. The federal government in Washington, D.C., reopened for business Monday after being closed for two days.

Flooding has contaminated water supplies in several regions, prompting the need to boil and disinfect water.

Dominion crews restored power to 32 primary water-pumping stations in the 30,000-square mile service area.

Virginia's electric customers suffered the worst power outages, and the state's biggest electric utility, Dominion Virginia Power, said it was down to about 758,000 that were still without power Monday morning.

Dominion has restored power to 1.1 million customers so far, the company said.

The company's service area stretches from the Outer Banks of North Carolina, to Tidewater, Central and Northern Virginia -- the exact area hit hardest by Isabel. The company has now restored power to approximately 60 percent of its customers affected by the hurricane.

Dominion's army of 9,700 employees, contractors, tree trimmers and crews from 11 assisting utilities continues working to restore service to the remaining transmission and primary distribution circuits ravaged by uprooted trees or broken limbs, torrential rains and high winds.

All hospitals that lost power because of the hurricane have been restored. The company is continuing to work with municipalities to identify other public infrastructure -- such as schools -- which need power.

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