$2.1 million in repairs completed on Santa Monica Bay ocean outfalls

The city of Los Angeles Department of Public Works has announced good news for Santa Monica Bay coastal waters and beaches in the vicinity of Playa Del Rey.

LOS ANGELES, Calif., Jan. 24, 2001 — The city of Los Angeles Department of Public Works has announced good news for Santa Monica Bay coastal waters and beaches in the vicinity of Playa Del Rey.

The Bureau of Engineering reports that $2.1 million in repairs have been completed on the city's ocean outfalls, or discharge pipes, that extend one and five-miles, respectively, from Hyperion Treatment Plant off Playa Del Rey into the Santa Monica Bay.

"Wave action and other diverse ocean conditions over time contributed to the deterioration of these 12-feet inside diameter steel reinforced concrete pipes," said Roger Tim Haug, Deputy city Engineer for the Wastewater Program.

"We completed this project just before the beginning of the rainy season and we believe repairs made will ensure that the outfalls remain intact for years to come." The Deputy City Engineer said repairs were done at 20 percent below the original estimated budget.

Local beaches as well as the ocean benefit from the outfall repairs since up to 420 million gallons of fully treated wastewater, or effluent, discharges daily through the five-mile pipe. The one-mile pipe is used in emergency conditions only. Hyperion treats more than two-thirds of the city's wastewater, covering a 600-square mile service area that includes 29 contract cities and agencies, with 6,500 miles of mainline sewers.

Repairs were made on the five-mile pipe, at depths of up to 190-feet. Anchoring materials and nearly 5,500 tons of two to 16-inch rocks were added to more than 4,600 feet of the pipe. A near-shore concrete encased section of the one-mile pipe was filled and protected, where it is supported with 14-inch steel bearing H-piles that extend from the shoreline to a water depth of about 30 feet.

Both pipes remained in service or available for service during repairs. Originally, they were built and put into operation in the late 1940s and late 1950s.

More in Home