Global Water Foundation enters world's biggest bike race

GWF has entered a team, including 2006 defending Wimbledon senior doubles champion Johan Kriek, to ride a grueling 65 mile race March 11 in South Africa to raise money. With 4,500 children dying daily from diseases related to dirty water, the United Nations Development Program called lack of clean water the "gravest threat to sustainable human development." Kriek with two professional cyclists will compete in the Cape Argus Pick 'n' Play Cycle Tour, the longest timed cycle tour in the world...

NAPLES, FL, Jan. 26, 2007 -- The Global Water Foundation (GWF) has entered a team to ride a grueling 65 mile race March 11 along the shores of South Africa to raise money in the fight against the world's biggest problem. An estimated 4,500 children die every day from diseases related to dirty water -- one child every 15 seconds. The head of the United Nations Development Program called the lack of clean water the "gravest threat to sustainable human development."

And 2006 defending Wimbledon senior doubles champion Johan Kriek along with two professional cyclists will compete in the world famous Cape Argus Pick 'n' Play Cycle Tour, known as the longest timed cycle tour in the world, and which last year attracted more than 35,000 riders.

"I'm riding this race as a way to bring awareness to what is the next great cause," said GWF founder Kriek, who added that for as little as $20, clean water can be provided to one child for an entire year. "With the pledges I receive from supporters, the amount of help we can provide to those children in need is beyond measure."

Kriek asks those interested in sponsoring him to visit the GWF Web site, www.globalwaterfoundation.org and click on the "Help the GWF ride for water!" link to pledge.

A native South African, Kriek founded the GWF in 2005 enlisting the support of celebrity friends including John McEnroe, Monica Seles, and Olympic icons such as Amanda Beard and Janet Evans. The Global Water Foundation is dedicated to delivering funds and technical assistance for clean water in the world's neediest communities. The GWF just completed a project in Uganda last fall that is now delivering clean water to 5,000 in a school district northeast of the capitol.

Following its inception in 1978, the Cape Argus Race has grown swiftly in popularity and takes riders (minimum age requirement of 12) around the beautiful Cape Peninsula in the Cape Town area of South Africa. Then there's the prize money -- nearly $17,000 is divided among the top 20 male and top five female cyclists.

On April 14, the GWF is also planning a "Walk for Water" on Sanibel Island, FL to raise additional funds for clean water. More details on the event will be forthcoming shortly. The walk is four miles -- the average distance an African woman must walk to reach a water source. Typically when she arrives, she learns the water is unsuitable for drinking.

The Global Water Foundation (www.globalwaterfoundation.org) was established as a charitable trust with the exclusive purpose of raising public awareness, providing technical assistance, supporting knowledge sharing, enabling technical innovation and research, and facilitating the provision of humanitarian aid throughout the developing world. The ultimate goal is to provide safe, healthy drinking water and adequate sanitation in areas where it is not available or where accessibility and supply have been compromised.

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