Further desalination contract awarded for Chile’s thirsty mining industry

With Chile’s mining industry providing 20% of the country’s GDP, the demand for water supplies is increasing with Doosan being awarded the latest in a line of desalination contracts, according to Bloomberg...

With Chile’s mining industry providing 20% of the country’s GDP, the demand for water supplies is increasing with a handful of contracts being awarded this summer.

Bloomberg has reported that South Korean company Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction CO. has signed a $103 million deal to build a desalination plant at the Escondida copper mine.

The planned 220,000 ton (622,600 m3/day) facility will supply water from mid-2016 and water produced will be piped 180 kilometers to the copper mine situated 3000 metres above sea level.

Last month WWi reported how a new 2.5 m3/second seawater desalination facility is being built to provide water to BHP Billiton’s Escondida mine in Chile, at an investment of US$1.9 million (see WWi story).

Doosan reportedly secured the contract over competition including France’s Degremont SA and Spanish firm Acciona, it said.

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