Product Focus: Microwave-Powered UV Disinfection System Validated for Water Reuse

A new microwave-powered, open channel, ultraviolet system from Severn Trent Services is designed for municipal wastewater disinfection and water reuse applications, featuring greater operating cost savings; lower whole-life cost; and long lamp life in a smaller footprint.

Severn Trent Services has launched the MicroDynamics® Series OCS721, a new microwave-powered, open channel, ultraviolet system for municipal wastewater disinfection and water reuse applications.

The new disinfection system offers greater operating cost savings; lower whole-life cost; and long lamp life in a smaller footprint. Modules can be placed side-by-side in channels for design flexibility and to reduce civil works requirements. In addition, the system is National Water Research Institute validated for water reuse.

The MicroDynamics OCS721 system meets dose, log reduction and water quality requirements for a variety of applications. The technology uses microwaves to energize low-pressure, high-output, electrodeless lamps to generate a UVC output of 254 nm, an optimal wave length for bacterial disinfection. The lamps also include a three-year warranty.

The system features MicroPace™ - a flow pacing technology that can match UV dose.

"This unique feature allows for reliable and accurate control of operating conditions in real time to save energy," said Stan Shmia, UV product manager at Severn Trent Services. "MicroDynamics OCS721 represents a significant advancement in UV lamp technology. Costly lamp maintenance and replacement are now things of the past."

Microwave-powered UV lamps are electrodeless and remove the major failure mechanism found in traditional UV lamp technology. The technology is becoming increasingly popular as a means to inactivate pathogenic organisms found in water and wastewater. Severn Trent Services offers systems in open channel designs for the UV disinfection of wastewater or closed vessel designs as a solution for both wastewater and drinking water treatment.

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