Asia/Pacific

China water plant expands using nano-filtration technology

Chinese water company Tri-Tech Holding has been awarded a 130 million Yuan ($20 million) contract to expand what will become the largest water treatment plant in the world using ultrafiltration and nanofiltration technology for the City of Ordos.

The initial project will allow the Ordos facility to process 96,000 m3/day of water per day, via traditional flocculation, sedimentation, and conventional filtration, followed by ultra filtration and nano-filtration treatment process.

The expansion phase is designed to allow processing of 104,000 m3/day treated via the traditional flocculation, sedimentation and conventional filtration process. Then approximately 50% of the treated water, or 52,000 m3, will undergo ultra filtration and nano-filtration treatment processes. The other 50% of the treated water, or 52,000 cubic meters, will bypass ultra- and nano-filtration.

Upon completion of the initial and the expansion phases, the combined output of up to 200,000 cubic meters per day will comply with the national drinking water standards as spelled out in GB5749-2006, of which 148,000 cubic meters per day will be ultra filtered and nano-filtered water.The project is scheduled for initial test runs no later than June 30, 2012. After completion, the ownership of the water purification plant will transfer to Dongsheng District of Ordos City.

Gavin Cheng, co-president of Tri-Tech, said: "Although we have faced a difficult winter that slowed construction in executing the contract...we have already completed 70% of the construction."

Phil Fan, Tri-Tech co-president, added: "China continues to face heavily polluted water sources, which led the Chinese government to issue the drinking water standard (GB5749-2006). This new standard increased water quality indicators from 35 to 106 and is required to be in force by 2012.

"Most of China's water treatment still uses coagulation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection. This traditional process is unable to process water at the rate demanded by China's population, which struggles with water quality issues such as disease-causing microorganisms, algae and algal toxins, turbidity, disinfection byproducts and unstable water quality. There is an urgent need for conventional water plants to be upgraded and to enhance wastewater treatment and reduce pollutant emissions, gradually reaching new drinking water standards in the country."

Tri-Tech CEO Warren Zhao, said: "Following the completion of the initial and expansion phases, the Ordos plant will be the world's largest treatment facility that uses ultra filtration and nano-filtration membrane technology.

"The Ordos facility will be capable of producing 148,000 cubic meters ultra filtered and nano-filtered water per day. The largest similar plant is the Mery-Sur-Oise Water Treatment Plant in Paris, France, which has a daily capacity of approximately 140,000 cubic meters." This project followed the initial contract awarded to Tri-Tech in 2010. The initial build-transfer project was valued at $40 million.

Water Standard and Samsung combine to deliver "water vessels"

Florida-based Water Standard has teamed up with Samsung Heavy Industries to design and develop vessels to deliver water treatment solutions to the offshore oil and gas sector.

The partnership will see Samsung construct vessels with Water Standard providing water treatment services and propriety process solutions and designs to help with oil recovery and produced water. One aim is to help maximise oil recovery through the technologies, which will be led by a team including former International Desalination Association president Lisa Henthorne.

Amanda Brock, CEO, said: "This partnership combines Water Standard's unique strengths and focus on a market that is growing rapidly with Samsung Heavy Industries."

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