Rome faces water rationing as drought takes grip

Water officials could soon be forced to impose water rationing in the Italian capital city of Rome following a prolonged period of drought...

Content Dam Ww Online Articles 2017 07 Italy Fountain

Content Dam Ww Online Articles 2017 07 Italy Fountain

ROME, Italy – Water officials could soon be forced to impose water rationing in the Italian capital city of Rome following a prolonged period of drought.

Water levels in the city’s main reservoir have dropped following two years of lower-than-average rainfall, according to water and electricity provider, Acea.

The Guardian reported that an order has been made that no further water should be drawn from Lake Bracciano, which was previously used as a backup drinking water supply for Rome.

Meanwhile The Australia said the lake’s level fell 1.5m following the dry spell at a withdrawal rate of 1600 litres a second.

Nicola Zingaretti, head of the local Lazio region told Tgcom24 TV station: “The truth is Lake Bracciano has fallen too much and we risk an environmental disaster.”

Meanwhile local media reported that water rationing could soon take place, with the supply being turned off for as long as eight hours per day.

An Acea spokesman reportedly told national news agency Ansa that: “The drastic reduction of the flow of water into the capital’s water network will force us to introduce a rigid rotation of supplies that will impact 1.5 million Romans.”

With 2017 expected to be one of the hottest years on record in Italy, Zingaretti was reported to have had a swipe at US president Donald Trump who last month pulled the US out of the 2015 Paris deal to fight climate change.

“I would like to invite Donald Trump here to let him see what it means not to respect climate accords,” she said.

Drinking fountains, which have been in operation since 1874 around the city of Rome were also closed by Acea for the first time in June to safeguard supplies.

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