Veolia bolsters nuclear wastewater clean-up services with $350m robotics acquisition

French giant Veolia has boosted its water/wastewater offerings in the nuclear cleanup technology space with a $350 million acquisition of US firm, Kurion...

Feb 4th, 2016
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French giant Veolia has boosted its water/wastewater offerings in the nuclear cleanup technology space with a $350 million acquisition of US firm, Kurion.

It was in 2013 when Veolia formed Asteralis to diversify into the radioactive waste clean up market, focusing on characterising waste and assessing nuclear facilities.

The latest acquisition of California company Kurion will help the company with waste separation, vitrification and robotics for access to sensitive areas.

Veolia's previous efforts serving the nuclear industry involved subsidiaries Veolia Water Technologies, SARP Industries and GRS Valtech.

The industrial water/wastewater treatment market is one many service providers are looking to diversify into, with sluggish sales from the municipal market.

Veolia is no exception. Between 2009 and 2011 alone the company saw a 35% increase in industrial contract bookings (read WWi article).

Above: How Veolia intends to integrate Kurion into its existing nuclear clean up services

Together with Kurion, the company said it will work in the clean up and the treatment of low and medium-level radioactive waste.

Last year Veolia won a three-year O&M contract to supply water and wastewater treatment services to South Korea’s largest nuclear power plant (read article).

Kurion has operations in the US (California, Washington, Colorado, Idaho and Texas), the United Kingdom and Japan.

The company claims it is the only international operator to be working at Fukushima on behalf of Tepco, the Japanese nuclear operator.

Veolia Water was also involved in the nuclear clean-up of the Fukushima site, treating highly radioactive water with nuclear firm Areva – a project earning €30 million revenue.

Antoine Frérot, chairman and CEO of Veolia, said: “By having all the expertise and solutions that are indispensable for the treatment of this type of waste, our company is confirming that it is what it has always been: a pioneer in the treatment and recovery of waste and resources.”

William Gallo, Kurion CEO, added: “The combination of the two companies establishes a major force in the nuclear restoration market."

This acquisition is subject to approval by US authorities, in particular US competition authorities.

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