Hydranautics membranes meet power challenges in China, Australia

The Yuhuan Seawater Desalination Plant, the largest desalination project in mainland Asia, takes in water from the East China Sea and supplies boiler feedwater to new area power stations.

The Yuhuan Seawater Desalination Plant, the largest desalination project in mainland Asia, takes in water from the East China Sea and supplies boiler feedwater to new area power stations. These 1800 mW power stations will expand China’s electrical grid capacity to satisfy current industrial needs and as part of China’s overall infrastructure expansion prior to the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing.

Increasingly, China is turning to desalinated seawater to meet its explosion in industrial water application needs, with the approaching Olympics only increasing the urgency for increased power generation and, in turn, both process and potable water - despite declining freshwater supplies.

Over 812 Hydranautics’ SWC5 elements are hard at work at the Yuhuan Plant as part of a massive system desalinating over 34,560 m3/d (9 MGD) of water. The seawater composite membrane elements supply 11,250 m3/d (3 MGD) of process water for the plant, while the plant’s surplus potable water is sold to surrounding communities.

With 400 ft3 (37.16 m3) of active membrane area, the membrane is designed to provide higher salt rejection at a higher rate of flow with increased boron rejection - 92%. This is a cost saving solution for both municipal and industrial applications, with each element providing 34.1 m3/d (9,000 gpd) at 99.8% nominal salt rejection at low operating pressures.

The Nitto Denko unit based in Oceanside, California, also was picked recently to provide 1,344 CPA3 reverse osmosis elements for the A$80M water treatment facility upgrade at the 2,640 mW Bayswater Power Station in New South Wales, Australia. And it recently opened sales offices in Mumbai, India, and Dubai, U.A.E.

Veolia builds on success with new China, Japan contracts

Consolidating its position as leader in providing populations with water services in Asia, Veolia Water won its 23rd major contract in China, for the complete management of the drinking water service and the operation of a wastewater treatment plant in the economic city of Haikou, the capital of one of China’s top tourist destinations, on the Island of Hainan, South China. Worth an estimated /day, a drilling production area in a natural aquifer with a capacity of 200,000 m3/day, and a 1,700 km water distribution network. Veolia will also manage a 300,000 m3/day wastewater treatment plant and eight Client Service agencies. Altogether, the water and wastewater services include 1,950 local employees.

In other news, a Veolia Water consortium, with Showa Kankyo Systems and Nishihara Techno Services, won a new €17.8 million contract in Japan for operation and maintenance of a wastewater treatment plant for the economic city of Chiba, near Tokyo. The 283,000 m3/day Hanamigawa No. 2 plant serves a population of about 500,000 inhabitants. Treatment includes aeration, denitrification and rapid filtration, thickening and sludge dehydration, and sludge incineration. The deal comes a year after Veolia won two other management contracts for wastewater treatment plants in Hiroshima and Saitama, near Tokyo.

Lastly, Veolia was to celebrate June 29 the Paris opening of its Biostyr nitrification/denitrification facility at the the Seine Aval wastewater treatment plant, one of the oldest and largest in Europe. The upgrade programme, coordinated for regional authority SIAAP under a contract to a consortium led by OTV France, also includes a major expansion of existing sludge processing and installation of new electrical substations. It forms the main element in the planned extension of full nitrogen treatment to all of the region’s wastewater by 2015.

Global Water R&D Center for Siemens opens in Singapore

Siemens Water Technologies opened its new Global Water Research and Development Center at PUB’s The WaterHub building in Singapore in early June. Dr. Ruediger Knauf oversees the Siemens R&D activities in the region as director. This is the first step toward the company’s previously announced €25 million investment in water technology research and product development in the Asia-Pacific region.

The center will collaborate with Singapore’s Public Utilities Board (PUB), universities and environmental authorities on water and wastewater treatment projects. The first involves work with PUB and A*STAR’s Institute of High Performance Computing (IHPC) to improve energy efficiency of its MBR process. Siemens water business has 15 R&D locations around the world and over 140 scientists focused on water-related research and development activities.

In other news, in a new seawater desalination project to supply process water for a steelworks belonging to Shougang Jiantang Iron & Steel United Co. Ltd., CNC Water Technology Ltd., a Siemens Chinese subsidiary in Beijing, is installing a system which works according to the MED (multi-effect distillation) principle.


Field Notes

Australia: Severn Trent Services won a contract to supply TETRA® Denite® biological denitrification filters for the Bundamba Advanced Water Treatment Plant, the first stage of the Queensland Government’s Western Corridor Recycled Water (WCRW) Project and largest scheme of its kind in Australia or the southern hemisphere. It involves recycling nearly all wastewater from six existing WWTPs in Brisbane and neighboring city Ipswich via three new advanced water treatment plants. A 200-km long pipeline will be built to deliver the recycled water to the region’s power generators, industry and major potable water supply system.

China: Household appliance and equipment maker MIDEA, of Shunde, Guangdong Province, and Germany’s inge AG will develop, design and manufacture UF membrane modules for use by MIDEA to launch a new product with inge technology for home drinking water purification. inge also won two Belgian deals for its dizzer® UF modules. The first treats water previously used for washing vegetables. The second involves process water for industrial companies taken from the river Ghent.

Korea: NSF International, a U.S.-based independent certification organization, and Korea Testing & Research Institute (KTR), a leading testing, certification and research organization in South Korea, signed a cooperative agreement to share their marks. Initially, the agreement will focus on product certifications in the areas of drinking water and food equipment.

China: With over 100 new WWTPs a year and total wastewater treatment investment of €30 billion through 2010, Danish pump maker Grundfos will build new production facilities in Suzhou, China. The new factory’s focus will be on SuperVortex and channel-impeller pumps, initially on models with motors from 20 to 250 kW. This doesn’t affect production of the same designs in Finland, where the factory continues to serve expanding East European markets. Grundfos also won the 2007 Frost & Sullivan Company of the Year Award in the water and wastewater industry for its product portfolio and focused customer-centric approach in breaking new ground as a manufacturer of multistage pumps.

Singapore: Engineering consultant CH2M Hill named Greg Turner as the regional business development and planning manager for Southeast Asia and India. Turner has 25 years of experience in construction and project management for water, wastewater, and infrastructure projects, along with extensive experience in design-build project delivery. Before joining the Broomfield, Colorado, USA-based firm, Turner served as the Asia manager of engineer, procure, and construct (EPC) proposals for Black & Veatch.

China: Engineering consultant Black & Veatch will provide special services on a Drainage Master Plan for the urban centre of Guangzhou City in Guangdong Province. The USA-based firm has been working in Guangzhou since January 2005 on the World Bank-funded Guangdong Pearl River Delta Urban Environment Project.

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