EPA “Success Stories” Feature Arsenic Treatment Programs

EPA has released 11 Arsenic Rule Compliance Success Stories, a series of case studies highlighting public water system experiences in meeting the revised drinking water standard.

Aug 1st, 2007

EPA has released 11 Arsenic Rule Compliance Success Stories, a series of case studies highlighting public water system experiences in meeting the revised drinking water standard. The community and non-residential water systems used innovative or lower cost approaches to meeting the revised 10 ppb maximum contaminant level for arsenic. The lessons learned from these utilities will assist the 1,700 public water systems still seeking a sustainable Arsenic Rule compliance solution.

Water systems need to be aware of the potential impacts that treatment changes can have on their ability to provide safe drinking water. EPA has also developed a new fact sheet to helps owners and operators understand and respond to issues that may arise with arsenic and their distribution system when treatment is installed or modified.

The Arsenic Rule Compliance Success Stories and the fact sheet Arsenic and Your Distribution System may be viewed online at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/arsenic/compliance.html.

AwwaRF Funds Research for Small Water Utilities

The Awwa Research Foundation (AwwaRF) is funding three new research projects that will be of particular benefit to smaller water utilities. The three projects, which are being funded for a total of $250,000, are the first to be funded through the new AwwaRF Small Systems Initiative, which was launched in January. Under the initiative, AwwaRF is focusing resources on the specific needs of small water utilities.

“Research targeted toward smaller water suppliers will help address issues that are unique to their size and limited resources,” said Robert C. Renner, Executive Director of AwwaRF. “The findings will assist them in delivering safe and affordable drinking water to the public, which ultimately benefits the nation’s drinking water community as a whole.”

The projects will develop new applications for determining the most cost-effective water treatment methods and for critically evaluating the cost and benefits of implementing a source water protection program. The research will also produce a guidance document on locating and proactively managing leaks from underground pipes, with particular emphasis on pipe materials and conditions that are relevant to small systems.

The Awwa Research Foundation (AwwaRF) is a member-supported, international, nonprofit organization that sponsors research to enable water utilities, public health agencies, and other professionals to provide safe and affordable drinking water to consumers. With more than 900 subscriber members in the U.S. and abroad, AwwaRF has funded and managed more than 1,000 projects valued at more than $400 million. More information on the Awwa Research Foundation is available at www.AwwaRF.org.

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