Water security experts to present NDWAC findings June 13 at AWWA

Dr. Rebecca Head, Ph.D., DABT, a member of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council who was co-chair of the Water Security Working Group and also serves as health officer/director for the Monroe County (Mich.) Public Health Department, will present findings of the working group's "Report on Water Security" at the AWWA convention in San Francisco on June 13...

DENVER, June 9, 2005 -- Dr. Rebecca Head, Ph.D., DABT, a member of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council who was co-chair of the Water Security Working Group and also serves as health officer/director for the Monroe County (Mich.) Public Health Department, will present findings of the working group's "Report on Water Security" at the American Water Works Association convention in San Francisco on Monday.

She'll be joined in her presentation by J. Alan Roberson, AWWA Security and Regulatory Affairs director, June 13 from 10:30-11 a.m. at the Moscone Convention Center.

NDWAC
The National Drinking Water Advisory Council (NDWAC) was formed in 1974 as part of the original Safe Drinking Water Act. The council's function is to support the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's drinking water program by providing advice and recommendations to the Administrator.

In summer of 2004, the NDWAC formed the Water Security Working Group to develop findings on security practices and programs, incentives for broad adoption of security practices in the water sector, and measures to gauge the extent of implementation of security practices. The group included 16 members representing a broad range of perspectives related to water security, including participants from large and small drinking water and wastewater treatment providers, rate setting organizations, technical assistance providers, the public health community at the state and local level, academia and community interest groups.

The Report
Earlier this month, the Water Security Working Group submitted its findings to the NDWAC which:
-- Address the basic scope and principles of an active and effective security program,
-- Identify significant system failures and key threats that security programs should consider,
-- Recommend 14 features that an active and effective security program should address,
-- Advise steps that government and others can take to support and encourage utility security efforts and,
-- Describe a framework for measuring utility security progress.

The entire report, which was endorsed by the National Drinking Water Advisory Council June 3, is available on AWWA's web site at: www.awwa.org/Advocacy/govtaff/govnew.cfm

AWWA (www.awwa.org) is one of the most authoritative resources for knowledge, information, and advocacy to improve the quality and supply of water in North America and beyond. It's the largest organization of water extent of implementation of security practices. The group included 16 members representing a broad range of perspectives related to water security, including participants from large and small drinking water and wastewater treatment providers, rate setting organizations, technical assistance providers, the public health community at the state and local level, academia and community interest groups.

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