ACWA: PPIC's California 2025 report highlights water agency needs

California 2025, the Public Policy Institute of California's (PPIC) newly released report on issues that will affect the state's future, recognized that local agencies are taking the lead in managing water supplies in California. But just as state and federal highways must be maintained to link city streets and county roads, so too must the state and federal governments invest in the state's "backbone" water storage and conveyance system...

SACRAMENTO, CA, June 2, 2005 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- California 2025, the Public Policy Institute of California's (PPIC) newly released report on issues that will affect the state's future, recognized that local agencies are taking the lead in managing water supplies in California. But just as state and federal highways must be maintained to link city streets and county roads, so too must the state and federal governments invest in the state's "backbone" water storage and conveyance system.

Population growth is among the factors mentioned that will impact California in the decades ahead, particularly where water is concerned. As the PPIC report rightly states, "the demand is going up, and the supply is actually shrinking."

The Association of California Water Agencies and its members agree with this assessment, and believe it's crucial to begin immediately addressing population growth and a number of other equally important concerns, such as global climate change and outdated infrastructure, among others, that threaten the state's water supply and water quality.

That's why ACWA released in May its report, No Time to Waste: A Blueprint for California Water, which lays out 12 specific recommendations that are a diverse mix of actions and investments to help California meet its water supply needs in the coming decades. The document represents the opinions of hundreds of local public water agencies from throughout the state, and is intended to serve as a roadmap for state and federal leaders to follow to ensure California has the water supply system it will need to support people, jobs and ecosystems in the future.

It's critical that the recommendations called for in ACWA's Blueprint are implemented without delay. Recommendations made in the Blueprint include improving the existing water conveyance system in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta; evaluating long-term threats to Delta levees and pursuing actions to reduce risks to the state's water supply and the environment; developing additional groundwater and surface water storage; and supporting and funding local efforts to expand recycled water use, water use efficiency and desalination of seawater and brackish groundwater.

The release of California 2025 reinforces the importance of creating sound water policy that will address the state's increasing demands upon water supplies.

ACWA is a statewide association whose 440 members are responsible for about 90% of the water delivered in California. To view No Time to Waste: A Blueprint for California Water, or for more information, please visit www.acwa.com.

In related news, see: "CA 2025: PPIC study projects future of the state, identifies key challenges".

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