Chabrouh Dam to solve drought problem

The Chabrouh Dam, which will supply eight million m3 of drinking water, and a recycling plant capable of processing 60,000 m3 of water each day, is expected to solve drought problems in Kesrouan, Lebanon.

The Chabrouh Dam, which will supply eight million m3 of drinking water, and a recycling plant capable of processing 60,000 m3 of water each day, is expected to solve drought problems in Kesrouan, Lebanon.

By 2005, local contractor Mouawad-Edde of Beirut is scheduled to complete the dam, which is located 40 km to the northeast of Beirut and covers an area totalling 42 ha. Local dealer J & G Abdelmassih United Est., is supplying two EC290 BLC excavators and four wheel loaders, ranging from Volvo's L20B compact machine to its L180E model, to complete the work. Compact wheel loaders are being used for load and carry operations inside the five tunnels that run under the dam. The units are equipped with 1.2 m3 light material buckets to move dirt, concrete, iron supports, sections of water pipe and other materials. These intake and drainage tunnels, the longest of which is 660 m, are being built using 100,000 m3 of concrete.

Mouawad-Edde deployed its L150E and L180E wheel loaders at Hadid Mountain and other locations, such as the crushing plant on site, where rock is being excavated to build the dam. The former machines sport 3.8 m3 capacity general purpose buckets and load split boulders on highway trucks, capable of hauling loads up to 20 m3. A total of two million m3 of rock will be used to build the dam.

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