Toxic Algae Warning issued for California's San Luis Reservoir and O’Neill Forebay

The State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water says there are currently no drinking water impacts from the algae.

Aug 5th, 2016
Content Dam Ww Online Articles 2016 08 Pr8416 Sanluis Algae
This photo taken on July 27 from the boat ramp near Dinosaur Point on San Luis Reservoir shows an up-close look at the bloom and mats forming on the surface. (Photo credit: Santa Clara Valley Water District)

CALIFORNIA, AUGUST 5, 2016 -- The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board and California State Parks Thursday issued a warning for San Luis Reservoir and O’Neill Forebay due to potential health risks associated with toxic blue-green algae.

Water sampling results at San Luis Reservoir’s Dinosaur Point Boat Ramp showed the highest level of toxic algae, but O’Neill Forebay and the North Beach Swim area also have been impacted. Health advisories are now posted at those sites urging people and pets to avoid contact with the water.

While San Luis Reservoir provides drinking water to many parts of California, the State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water says there are currently no drinking water impacts from the algae.

In recent weeks, similar toxic algae warnings have been issued for other major reservoirs including Shasta Lake and Lake Oroville.

According to the California Department of Public Health, blue-green algae, known as cyanobacteria, occurs naturally in surface waters but can quickly multiply into a toxic bloom especially in warmer, summer months. Toxic algae can cause a number of health problems including cold- and flu-like symptoms, liver failure, nerve damage and death. Children and pets are especially susceptible.

For more information about blue-green algae please visit the California Department of Public Health’s website.

Source: ACWA

About ACWA
The Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA) is the largest statewide coalition of public water agencies in the country. Its 430 public agency members collectively are responsible for 90% of the water delivered to cities, farms and businesses in California.

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