Thirteen Ohio water systems under lead advisory

When a public water system has more than 15 parts per billion of lead, it must notify residents of the issue within 30 days.

Feb 17th, 2016

COLUMBUS, Ohio, Feb. 17, 2016 -- Water in 13 Ohio facilities are under lead advisories, according to the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

Response to lead contamination has come under scrutiny after officials in Flint, Michigan, and Sebring, Ohio, failed to promptly notify residents of high levels of lead in public water systems.

The U.S. EPA defines a public water system as an entity that provides at least 15 service connections or serves an average of at least 25 people for at least 60 days a year. Under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act, when a public water system has more than 15 parts per billion of lead, it must notify residents of the issue within 30 days and send public education information within 60 days.

The affected systems and advisory dates are listed below:

Bainbridge Center Building, Chagrin Falls: Advisory began Jan. 27, 2016
Premier Park Estates mobile home park, 22970 St Rt 30, Minerva: Advisory began Dec. 3, 2015
Sebring: Advisory began Dec. 3, 2015
Hillside mobile home park, Mansfield: Advisory began Nov. 18, 2015
ICASI Culinary School, Chesterland: Advisory began Nov. 2, 2015
Echo Lake Community Association, Hinckley: Advisory began Nov. 2, 2015
Lorantffy Care Center, Copley: Advisory began Oct. 29, 2015
Grand Lake Estates mobile home park, Celina: Advisory began: Oct. 8, 2015
The Ridge Project, McClure: Advisory began Oct. 6, 2015
Schrop Junior High School, Akron: Advisory began: Sept. 28, 2015
Manchester United Methodist Church/Here for You Child Development, Akron: Advisory began Aug. 25, 2015
Holden Arboretum, Kirtland: Advisory began Dec. 5, 2014
Westview Mobile Home Park, Doylestown: Advisory began Oct. 21, 2013

In a letter sent last week to Ohio senators Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman, EPA Director Craig Butler said he wants to shorten the timeline water systems have to notify people of problems. The Ohio EPA is also working with state lawmakers to enact stronger, state water quality rules.

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