WaterWorld Weekly: April 21, 2011

Transcript of the April 21, 2011, edition of the WaterWorld Weekly newscast.

The following is a transcript of the April 21, 2011, edition of the WaterWorld Weekly newscast.

Click 'Play Video' to watch WaterWorld Weekly newscast.
Hi, I'm Angela Godwin, digital media editor for WaterWorld magazine, bringing you this week's water and wastewater news headlines. Coming up...

• Government fracking report released
• Virtual event issues call for papers
• Green infrastructure survey seeks input
• Reservoir fix could cost pretty penny
• Biogas facility breaks ground

[story1]
A new report released by the House Energy and Commerce Committee represents the first comprehensive national inventory of chemicals used by hydraulic fracturing companies during the drilling process.

It summarizes the types, volumes, and chemical contents of hydraulic fracturing products used by the 14 leading oil and gas service companies between 2005 and 2009.

Among its findings: components used in hydraulic fracturing products ranged from harmless -- such as salt and citric acid -- to extremely toxic substances, such as benzene and lead.

In fact, the companies used 29 chemicals that are known or suspected human carcinogens.

For more information on the report, visit the Energy and Commerce website at democrats.energycommerce.house.gov.

[story2]
Virtual H2O, the completely online water industry conference and expo, has opened its call for abstracts for the September 13th event.

Organizers are seeking informative, non-commercial presentations on water and wastewater industry projects, technologies, and case histories.

There's no cost to participate and absolutely no travel required!

If you would like to share your expertise with industry peers, visit virtualh2oevent.com to submit your abstract by May 20.


[story3]
The Clean Water America Alliance is conducting a survey of green infrastructure stakeholders and needs your feedback.

Through the results of the survey, the Alliance wants to understand the obstacles and challenges faced by the cities and communities moving toward adoption of green infrastructure initiatives.

The results will be compiled and analyzed into a report that will be sent to participants as well to the EPA. The Alliance hopes the data will help the agency with its stormwater rulemaking efforts.

To participate in the survey, please visit cleanwateramericaalliance.org.

[story4]
Tampa Bay Water is estimating it could cost between $120 and $170 million to fix cracks in its C.W. Bill Young Regional Reservoir's cement liner.

If that's the case, it could very well cost more to fix the reservoir than it did to construct it. That cost $140 million.

The utility is pursuing a lawsuit with the engineers who originally built the reservoir and hope to recoup some of the repair costs.

But in the meantime, Tampa Bay is reviewing plans from four approved engineering firms. Once it selects a designer, the utility hopes to start repair work in September 2012.

[story5]
A new biogas clean up facility in San Diego broke ground this week.

The Trident BioFuels Energy gas processing facility at the Point Loma Wastewater Treatment Plant in San Diego County will process wastewater biogas, clean it up, and produce methane, which will be injected into an SDG&E natural gas pipeline.

The facility will be the first in the State of California to inject treated biogas into the utility gas distribution system.

It's expected to be operational in October 2011.

For WaterWorld magazine, I'm Angela Godwin. Thanks for watching.

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