Miya research shows major concern among water industry experts

One of the major challenges of the modern world is finding viable solutions to tackle water shortage -- an issue which is increasingly impacting countries, regions and their development. One solution to this growing problem is recouping the water currently lost through the water system. Newly launched global water loss management company, Miya, commissioned a survey among water industry experts to gauge their opinions on the scale of the problem and ways to address it...

• Water industry experts 'shocked' by the extent of water loss and believe that we will face crisis if water loss is not resolved within 15 years

Oct. 28, 2008 -- One of the major challenges of the modern world is finding viable solutions to tackle water shortage -- an issue which is increasingly impacting countries, regions and their development. One solution to this growing problem is recouping the water currently lost through the water system. Newly launched global water loss management company, Miya, commissioned a survey among water industry experts to gauge their opinions on the scale of the problem and ways to address it.

It is conservatively estimated that the world loses around one third of its drinking water each year -- equivalent to 32 billion cubic meters and valued at approximately 18 billion USD -- through water systems. The survey shows that more than one third of respondents were unaware of the extent of water loss and almost all respondents (93 percent) found it 'unacceptable'. Majority of questioned experts (67%) believe this is a disaster waiting to happen -- "if water loss is not resolved in the next 15 years, we are likely to face crisis."

The industry believes it has 'an environmental obligation' to address water loss. Two thirds of respondents believe that the water industry will be held accountable for water loss and will be expected to compensate for it within the next ten years.

Respondents stated that lack of funding and a reluctance to invest based on concern over revenue returns are the greatest barriers to resolving water loss. Just over 50 percent of respondents cited general lack of awareness of the issue as a problem, and just under 50 percent believe the water industry itself is unaware of the extent of the problem.

Given demographic and economic trends, it is estimated that the world will need 40 percent more water by 2025. Respondents identified reducing water loss as the best and the most cost-effective solution to increasing water supply. An ability to provide turnkey solutions, including funding, is considered key in the successful implementation of water loss projects.

Booky Oren, President and CEO, Miya, said, "That the industry believes that the extent of water loss is unacceptable is no real surprise to us. That financing and lack of comprehensive coordination are perceived as major barriers to implementing effective water loss solutions is no real surprise to us. Miya was conceived to meet a very real and growing need. We believe that by offering municipalities best know-how and expertise as well as unparalleled range of services, including effective financial solutions, we will enable many cities to address the growing problems with their water systems.

"What was surprising to us was the industry's concern over lack of awareness. We as an industry have a collective responsibility to sound the alarm and to address the fundamental threat water loss poses to safe, clean, affordable drinking water in cities."

The research was conducted by independent UK-based research firm, Circle Research, among water industry experts in September 2008. The respondents came from water utilities, consultancy, university, research institute and corporate backgrounds.

Miya, an Arison Group company, represents Arison Group's commitment to sustainability and to the effort to prepare our planet to meet the needs of future generations. Miya's mission is to help the cities of the world benefit from the huge opportunity presented by water loss reduction and effective management of urban water.

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