Basin Water to supply nitrate removal system to Port of Walla Walla

Basin Water Inc. has received approval for the installation of a high-efficiency ion exchange system to remove nitrate at a new potable water source for the Port of Walla Walla, WA. The contract marks the first Basin Water installation in the state. Basin Water's high-efficiency nitrate removal unit will serve the new water system designed by Anderson Perry & Associates for the 122 acre Burbank Business Park located at the confluence of the Snake and Columbia Rivers...

• First installation in Washington state expands geographic footprint in western region

RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA, Feb. 26, 2008 -- Basin Water Inc. announced that it has received approval for the installation of a high-efficiency ion exchange system to remove nitrate at a new potable water source for the Port of Walla Walla, WA. The contract marks the first Basin Water installation in the state and is part of the company's plans to grow operations nationwide while also developing new technologies and applications for their water treatment technology+services business.

According to Mike Stark, President and Chief Executive Officer of Basin Water, the need for effective treatment technology with manageable costs and total reliability faces communities throughout the United States. "Delivering adequate supplies of high quality drinking water is one of the biggest challenges our communities face as they look to sustain growth through a safe and reliable source of water. The treatment of groundwater for use in drinking water systems is one of the best solutions for meeting that challenge, and we at Basin Water are excited to bring our 'worry-free water' approach to the State of Washington," he said.

Basin Water's high-efficiency nitrate removal unit will serve the new water system designed by Anderson Perry & Associates for the 122 acre Burbank Business Park located at the confluence of the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Basin Water is supplying the system as a subcontractor to Apollo Inc., the general contractor for the project. The installation is expected to be brought online by June of this year and will remove nitrate to levels below 7 parts per million (ppm) nitrate as nitrogen. The system will deliver up to 650,000 gallons of water per day (450 gpm) at peak flow rates. The unit is modular in design, and its treatment capacity can be easily increased to satisfy increased demand.

Nitrates are ionic substances widely found in the environment as byproducts of fertilizers, septic systems and groundwater recharge and can migrate easily into drinking water supplies. Once ingested, nitrates are converted into nitrites, which react chemically within the digestive and circulatory systems and have been linked to a number of cancers, diseases and methemoglobinemia, or "blue baby syndrome." Nationally, the EPA has established a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 ppm nitrate as nitrogen as part of the Safe Drinking Water Act. Nitrate is recognized by the United States Geological Survey as one of the most widespread contaminants of shallow groundwater across the United States, particularly in agricultural areas.

According to Orlando Carreño, Vice President, Western Region of Basin Water, this first project in the state of Washington bolsters Basin Water's regional presence as a provider of water treatment technology. "Basin Water offers some of the most reliable and flexible water treatment solutions available, and we are excited by the prospect of being able to bring those solutions to new communities in the Western U.S.," Carreño said. "We look forward to working closely with the Port of Walla Walla in getting this system running and assuring a cost-effective, compliant source of drinking water for the people they serve," he concluded.

Basin Water Inc. is a provider of reliable, long-term process solutions for a range of clients, which includes designing, building and implementing systems for the treatment of contaminated groundwater, the treatment of wastewater, waste reduction and resource recovery.

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