Unique remediation solution wins 2009 Outstanding Ground Water Project Award

CAMBRIDGE, MA, Oct. 1, 2009 -- CDM has been honored with the 2009 Outstanding Ground Water Project Award from the National Ground Water Association for the development of a unique groundwater cleanup solution using enhanced anaerobic bioremediation...

• Innovative EAB technology application yields impressive results

CAMBRIDGE, MA, Oct. 1, 2009 -- CDM has been honored with the 2009 Outstanding Ground Water Project Award in the Ground Water Remediation category from the National Ground Water Association (NGWA) for the development of a unique groundwater cleanup solution using enhanced anaerobic bioremediation (EAB) for Rockwell Automation.

CDM and Rockwell collaborated on an effective remediation solution for groundwater contamination at a 9-acre site in Orlando, Florida, that previously housed a computer circuit board manufacturing facility. EAB is the process of adding a substrate to the naturally occurring bacteria in groundwater, breaking down contaminants into harmless byproducts in situ. In conjunction with a unique groundwater recirculation technique, EAB is addressing the problem of high-concentration, mixed chlorinated solvents. These solvents had leached into the groundwater due to poor chemical storage practices prior to Rockwell's acquisition of the site.

Pilot testing proved the effectiveness of EAB using potassium lactate and groundwater circulation, which at the time was unproven on such a highly contaminated site. In addition to leveraging the power of naturally occurring bacteria, CDM designed an innovative well system -- comprised of horizontal recovery and vertical injection wells -- used to inject lactate and continuously recirculate groundwater, ensuring that lactate, bacteria, and contaminants are in constant contact. Once lactate was added and water recirculation began, the site underwent an unprecedented bacterial population boom, resulting in decreased contaminant concentration. This approach creates an environment unmatched using typical injection techniques.

Within the first 6 months of full-scale operation, volatile organic compound (VOC) mass was reduced by more than 90 percent. According to March 2009 measurements, the estimated total VOC mass had been reduced from 2,897 pounds (prior to system start-up) to 240 pounds. CDM is conducting ongoing site monitoring and the results indicate that the self-sustaining system continues to remediate groundwater contamination at an impressive rate.

CDM is a consulting, engineering, construction, and operations firm delivering exceptional service to public and private clients worldwide. Visit our Web site at www.cdm.com.

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